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How to Respond to “Walk Me Through Your Resume”

How to Respond to “Walk Me Through Your Resume”

At the beginning of a job interview, the hiring manager will typically start the meeting off with an introductory or ice breaker question. This question usually is some iteration of, “Tell me a little more about yourself.” However, some interviewers may also begin an interview by saying, “Can you walk me through your resume?” So, what’s the difference in this interview question, and what are hiring managers looking for in your response?

What the interviewer is looking for

When an interviewer asks you to walk them through your resume, they are looking for a brief overview of your work history. Essentially, this is your elevator pitch of who you are and highlights what you bring to the table. This question is your chance to connect the dots between your experience, skill sets, and qualifications to paint a picture of your candidacy to the hiring team. In other words, it’s kind of like audibly going through the same details you would share in a cover letter but with a human element since you have the platform to present it face-to-face in your meeting.

Tailor your answer

So, now you know why interviews ask you to walk them through your resume, how do you formulate your answer? Well, just like your resume, you must tailor your response here to fit the role you are interviewing for. The things you touch on must be relevant for the position you are meeting about. If you don’t have certain qualifications that are imperative for this position, this is your opportunity to elaborate on your transferrable skills. If you are well into your career, there is no need to go over every position you’ve had. Don’t go beyond 10 – 15 years. This overview is supposed to be short and sweet, like an elevator pitch.

Current, past, future

So, before you launch into your answer, you have to ensure you have the proper framework. It’s best to kick off our answer with your current position and skillsets. This position is where you should focus your energy because it will likely relate to the job you are interviewing for. Next, touch on your past roles. Briefly give a high-level overview of your duties, responsibilities, and projects as they relate to this new position. Finally, wrap your answer up by discussing the future. This is where you explain your career goals and why this position is an excellent fit for you. Using this format will help you deliver a concise yet effective response to “walk me through your resume.”

Practice makes perfect

The hiring manager asking you to walk through your resume is a common interview opener, and thus, you must practice your response. Yes, you should tailor your answer for each position, but your first impression will be lackluster if you don’t have your response pinned down. Practice rehearsing your response out loud to help you sound confident during your interview. If you are not ready to answer this question, you will likely start to ramble, and your response will be more incoherent. This response sets the tone for the rest of your interview, so you must have it ironed out to receive that job offer!

Want more interview advice?

The next time an interviewer asks you to, “Walk me through your resume,” you will be ready to answer this question confidently and effectively. If you are interested in more interview advice, take a look at our blog! We have hundreds of helpful articles with tips, tricks, and examples to help you nail your interview. Good luck!

3 Phrases to Never Say During a Job Interview

3 Phrases to Never Say During a Job Interview

When you finally land an opportunity to interview for a role that you are excited about, you probably have many emotions going through your mind. You are excited, relieved, anxious, and all of the above. However, how you present yourself primarily comes from your word choice or the phrases you use. Even small changes in your responses can have massive implications and leave your credibility in doubt with the hiring team. Here are three phrases to never say during a job interview to help you seal the deal.

“I don’t have much experience with this, but”

If there is a particular skill set that the hiring manager inquires about during your interview, never follow up with an answer like this, even if it’s true. Never lie about your qualifications during an interview (or any time during the hiring process). But, in your response, highlight the capabilities and experiences that you do have instead of focusing on the ones you don’t. If your answer emphasizes your limitations, you are making the hiring manager’s decision pretty easy. Basically, you must show how your experience makes you an asset or that you are ready for a new challenge. You can cross off everything on the hiring team’s list, but if you make them think you are unqualified for the position, you are doing yourself a disservice.

“My salary expectations are $X, but I am flexible.”

Never say this phrase during a job interview. If you are in a pre-screen meeting or a final interview, this question may arise. If a hiring professional asks you about your salary expectations, you must be prepared to answer this question. Do your due diligence beforehand to understand what you are worth. This range will be based on your field, location, years of experience, and qualifications. Once you have a number in mind, stick to it. Unless you really don’t care about your salary requirements, never say that you are flexible. Even if you are flexible with your pay, stating that you are flexible indicates to the hiring manager that you are willing to take less money. Instead of saying you are flexible with your salary, use your research to your advantage.

Here is an example: “for my next career move, I am looking for a salary between $65,000 and $70,000. This is based on comparisons from other professionals in this market with over five years of experience in this field and the unique skills I bring to the table.”

If you are looking for more advice on discussing salary expectations during an interview, check out this blog!

“I don’t have any questions.”

When you get to the end of almost any interview, the interviewer will likely ask if you have any questions. If your response is, “I don’t have any questions,” you are writing your own rejection letter. Having a few meaningful questions prepared is your opportunity to illustrate your interest in the position and make a lasting impression on the hiring team. Before your meeting, have a couple of questions at the ready. These questions can be about the role, the company, the team, or even about something one of the interviews mentioned earlier in the discussion.

If you want some help generating some questions to ask during your interview, here is some insight on what kind of questions you should be asking (and with some examples!).

So, these are three phrases to never say during a job interview. If you are looking for more interview advice, we have a plethora of tips and tricks on the JSG Blog!

When & How to Bring Up Salary in An Interview

When & How to Bring Up Salary in An Interview

There’s no denying that bringing up salary discussions during your interview can be tricky. On the one hand, you don’t want to seem greedy. However, you also want to make sure that you’re not wasting your (or the interviewer’s) time, and you can get what you’re worth. Not to worry, we are covering when and how to bring up salary in an interview so that you can feel confident and prepared during your job search.

When To Bring Up Salary in an Interview  

Before we jump into when you should broach the salary question during an interview, please keep in mind that every situation is different. In an ideal world, you would wait until the hiring manager brings it up. In some hiring processes, the company wants to clear the air right off the bat and asks you to disclose your salary expectations in the application or initial phone screen. If the interviewer does not mention it by the end of the first interview, it is appropriate to bring it up. However, you must do so strategically!

How To Bring Up Salary in An Interview  

First and foremost, it’s essential to be upfront and honest. Explain why you want to discuss salary so that the interviewer doesn’t get the impression that you’re all about the money. Then, try to get them to disclose their salary range before you disclose your expectations. That way, you can keep your cards close to your chest for the time being!

Then, set clear expectations. In other words, you need to do your homework before the interview! Perform searches on salary websites such as salary.com to establish a range you’re comfortable with earning. On one of these sites, input your exact job title, location, and years of experience. This information should give you a solid baseline for what you can and should be making. Then, consider your personal factors such as cost of living, family, and unique skillsets you offer.

Here are some example scripts

Here are a few examples of how to bring up salary in an interview:

“Before we get any further, would you mind sharing the salary range for this position? I want to make sure it aligns with my career goals as I sincerely value your time and investment in this hiring process.”

“For my next position, I expect to make $76,000. This is based on comps in my area, my experience in the field, and the unique skills I can offer your company.”

No matter what, understand those salary conversations are essential in 2021 and beyond. You bring value to the table, and you deserve a company that will recognize and honor that value! Don’t be afraid to broach the subject of salary in an interview but do so with tact. Now that you understand how to determine your worth take a look at our available job opportunities! We have hundreds of exciting positions across North America.

Why Hiring Managers Ask About Your Hobbies in Interviews

Why Hiring Managers Ask About Your Hobbies in Interviews

Sometimes the most innocent interview questions can catch us off guard. Hiring managers often ask, “what are your hobbies?” or “what do you like to do for fun outside of work?” You might be curious about the intention of these questions. Are they just trying to get to know you better? Or are they trying to read into your hobbies to see how you will fit with the company’s culture? Here are a few reasons why hiring managers ask about your hobbies in interviews.

It’s often an icebreaker question

Most of the time, asking about your hobbies is just an icebreaker question. In most situations, hiring managers will start with a few simple questions to get the interviewee talking and help them feel more relaxed during an otherwise tense setting. Asking about your hobbies is an easy way to help candidates open up and get them to speak more authentically throughout the interview. When the interviewee feels a little more relaxed, they are more likely to be themselves rather than put up a facade of what they think the hiring manager is looking for. So, if this question is brought up early on in your meeting, don’t read too much into it.

Shows what candidates are passionate about

Also, when hiring managers ask you about your hobbies in interviews, they may be trying to discover your passions. Sure, you can say your passions align with the company’s core values and mission statement. But do your hobbies back up these principles? Asking about your hobbies outside of work is an excellent way for hiring managers to get a better picture of the real you. It’s easy to put up a wall during an interview and show them what you think they want to hear. But a candidate divulging what they enjoy doing outside of work can provide better insight into what drives them and what they care about.

Hobbies can identify transferrable skills

When a hiring manager asks about your hobbies, they are sometimes trying to identify transferrable skills. Sure, you may have three years of experience in your field, but does your love of rock climbing or crocheting blankets have skills, such as leadership or attention to detail, that can translate to the job you are applying for? Basically, sharing your hobbies with hiring managers can help them understand how well-rounded you are as a person.

Additionally, these transferrable skills are even more significant for entry-level candidates with little to no real experience. If you are fresh out of school or made a career change during the pandemic, you may have little to no experience in this field or industry. However, understanding your hobbies and how you spend your free time can help the interviewers grasp what you can bring to the table, even if you don’t have direct experience.

When discussing your hobbies, be honest and provide examples

So, when you are asked this question in your interview, how do you tackle this question? First of all, have some appropriate hobbies at the top of your mind. Yes, we all like watching Netflix and hanging out with our friends. However, you must share hobbies that add value to your candidacy and reflect some of your skill sets. Think of hobbies that demonstrate drive, personal development, leadership qualities, and/or creativity. So whatever hobby you decide to share during your interview, be ready to provide examples and express why you enjoy that hobby. Explaining why you enjoy volunteering at your local food bank or cross-country skiing allows you to inject your personality during the hiring process and show off some of your soft skills that can be useful in this role.

Regardless of what hobby or activity you choose, do not lie about it. If you say you love playing chess and actually have no idea how to play, and you just want to look clever, you are in a world of trouble. Never lie about a hobby. The hiring manager may ask detailed questions about it, or coincidentally, share the same hobby. If you cannot intelligently discuss it, it won’t add value to your candidacy (and can hurt your chances if they suspect you are lying).

Are you looking for more job-search advice?

So, these are three reasons why hiring managers ask about hobbies during an interview. If you are looking for more job-search advice, take a look at our candidate resources! We have hundreds of helpful guides, articles, and tips to help you successfully land your next job.

5 Video Interview Mistakes to Avoid

5 Video Interview Mistakes to Avoid

Ah, the dreaded video interview. You might have nightmares of answering a question while still on mute, having your computer freeze mid-elevator pitch, or your cat walking across your keyboard as you try to explain how detail-oriented you are. And while virtual interviews present a unique set of challenges, they don’t have to be anxiety-inducing. Keep reading for five video interview mistakes you should avoid and how to do so professionally.

Having A Messy Background  

One of the detriments to interviewing over video is that you are exposing your personal space. With a traditional interview, you’re traveling to their office and thus don’t have to worry about presenting an organized and professional environment. Keep your area clear of clutter, make sure there’s plenty of natural light, and limit the amount of stuff in the background.

Dressing Unprofessionally  

You’ve seen the horror stories of people not wearing pants on Zoom calls. Don’t be that person! Make sure you are dressed professionally from head to toe (even if you think you’ll only be on camera from the waist up.) Additionally, consider how specific colors and patterns look on camera. A good rule of thumb is to stick with neutrals and clean lines. A blazer with a plain shirt underneath is always a great bet!

Not Practicing Beforehand  

No preparing before your interview is one of the biggest video interview mistakes you can make. With all of the complications that technology can bring, you do not want to be caught off guard! Test out your video camera (don’t forget to check your background while you’re at it!), make sure your audio works okay, and most importantly, find a spot in your house that gets excellent Wi-Fi. Most employers will be understanding if you have technical difficulties. Still, it can throw off your confidence if you have to repeat things or move locations to find better Wi-Fi in the middle of your interview.

Not Limiting Distractions  

When video interviewing from your home, this is a big one. Put the dogs outside, find something to occupy the kids, and turn your phone on silent. Now, we understand that some interruptions are inevitable. The mailman might set off your dog, or your kid desperately needs fruit snacks at the most inconvenient times. In these cases, it can be helpful to be upfront about your environment right when the interview starts. For example, say, “Before we get started, I did want to warn you that my 3-year-old is in the next room. I explained to him that I had an important meeting, but we all know how that goes!” Interviewers will appreciate your honesty and communication.

Not Taking Advantage of the Benefits Video Interviewing Offers  

Last but perhaps most importantly, do not miss an opportunity to take advantage of the benefits of video interviewing. That’s right, along with all the challenges, there are good sides to a virtual interview! Unlike an in-person interview, you can surround yourself with tools to help guide you through an interview. Think of answers to tough questions like “what is your greatest weakness?” or some quick notes on recent accomplishments the company has gained. Another great thing to have handy is some questions to ask when you get to the interview’s final minutes. These can all be transcribed in a word document on a second screen, jotted down on sticky notes surrounding your laptop, or even just written out in a notebook on your desk.

Don’t be intimidated by these video interview mistakes

In the end, you don’t have to be intimidated by video interviews. While they do come with a unique set of challenges, they also present a few opportunities to show your personality and prepare ahead of time. Are you interested in more interview advice? Explore our library here!

Interview Tips to Help You Land Your Next Job

Interview Tips to Help You Land Your Next Job

Interviews are an essential step to a potential job opportunity to show off who you are and showcase how you will make a positive impact. As you start to land more interviews, nerves can be a familiar feeling headed into an interview when thinking about why you would make a great fit. This feeling is normal and can sometimes bring a lot of stress to someone. That is why we will breaking down some essential tips to help you land your next job. 

Confidence is Key 

It is no secret that any potential employer will want to see some confidence in any candidate they interview. That is why practicing the way you talk throughout your interview is imperative. If you can portray that you are confident in your work and yourself, it will impress any hiring manager. Having confidence in your ability to talk is not the only thing, but also how you prepare for the interview itself. By researching the company or business you are interviewing for, you will feel more confident about why you want the position and how you will fit into that specific role. This research can help you connect your experience from your resume to the job you are applying for, giving the hiring manager a better sense of how you make a positive impact.

Connecting these dots is a great way to follow up with specific interview questions, showing them that you are excited about this opportunity. Overall, having confidence coming into an interview will naturally give off a great impression to any hiring manager and help you land your next job.

Knocking Down the Interview Questions 

During your interview, you are going to be asked a ton of questions. Some questions will be easier than others, but clearly answering all the questions is essential to land your next job. The main idea of answering any interview question is showing value and demonstrating and providing examples. You mustn’t ramble past the original question and keep your responses to a reasonable length. Hiring managers can lose focus if you start to wander on one question and lose track of what you are saying. It is essential to keep your responses to questions focused on the topic and relating it back to your prospective new job.

If you want to knock down your interview questions and land your next job, practice your answers to some of the most common (and tricky) interview questions.

Show Off Who You Are 

The whole point of an interview is to show off your personality and who you are. Hiring managers want to get a sense of who you are, so it is crucial to take advantage of small talk and storytelling. In going into and out of your interview, you will find some time to talk to the hiring manager about random things that pop up. For example, talking about the weather outside and what activities you like to do outside of work. This chit-chat can be an excellent opportunity to illustrate some of your personality and help you establish rapport with the hiring team. When storytelling, you have a chance to create a narrative of your career and what you want to do in the future. Again, this is an excellent opportunity to give the interviewers a sneak peek into your personality and help you land your next job.

Follow Up 

Finally, after any interview you have, it is crucial to thank the hiring team for their time. Always make sure to send a thank-you email and reiterate your gratitude for the interview. In your email, you should briefly summarize why you are a perfect fit for the team and what you can bring to the table. Are you interested in more interviewing tips or tricks? Check out our interview prep and advice resources to help you land your next job! 

How to Recover from An Interview Disaster

How to Recover from An Interview Disaster

A job interview is a stressful experience, and it can be easy to get rattled. Most of us have unfortunately had an interviewing blunder – after all, it’s part of the process. Whether it was a missed opportunity to share one of your skill sets, a question you weren’t prepared to answer, or something completely slipped your mind; it happens to the best of us. So, can you redeem yourself post-interview to save your chances of landing a new opportunity? Here is how you recover from an interview disaster to approach this predicament with grace.

Stay calm

If you catch yourself in the middle of an interview disaster, the first step is to stay calm. Panicking or overreacting will only make the situation worse. Everybody makes mistakes and what matters is how you recover from them. If you make a mistake in an interview, take a moment to compose yourself before you act. If you get worked up or rush to try to redeem yourself, you may dig yourself a deeper hole.

Buy yourself a few moments

If you get yourself in a pickle during your interview, you can do some damage control during your meeting. For example, if an interview question stumps you, you can buy yourself some time instead of panicking, trying to formulate a lackluster answer. To do this, ask your interviewer to repeat the question, ask a clarification question, or even request a moment to think. So, if an interviewer asks you a tricky question, you can stall a bit by saying something like, “That’s a really great question. I have actually never been asked that before.” Even a quick couple of sentences like that can buy you enough time to formulate a response without providing a filibuster answer.

If you make a mistake, redeem yourself immediately

If you do make a mistake, redeem yourself immediately. Whether it’s a question you can’t answer, or you forget to tie in a skill set or project while answering a question, remedy the interview disaster ASAP. For example, we recently interviewed an intern here at JSG. We asked about a certificate listed on their resume, and they couldn’t tell us anything they learned from the course. They sent a follow-up email three days later apologizing again and providing some details on the certification, but it was too little, too late.

They did the right thing by emailing the team and providing some insight on this certification, but they should have done it the same day. In that three-day span, we interviewed several excellent candidates, and unfortunately, this interviewee didn’t make the cut. Therefore, if you find yourself in this situation, the right move is to send an email and clarify a response or provide more information. However, you must do so as soon as humanly possible to recover from an interview disaster.

Learn from your interview disaster

The best way to recover from an interview disaster is to learn from it. It is unfortunate, and depending on the mistake, it can cost you your chances of landing the job. However, as long as you learn from your mishap, it isn’t a complete failure. You will be ready mentally and physically if this situation arrives again and be able to recover from it in the future. The great John Wooden summed this up perfectly when he said, “Failure isn’t fatal, but failure to change might be.”

If you are looking for more interviewing advice, review our candidate resources! We have dozens of helpful tips and advice to help you nail the interview and receive that much-deserved job offer.

3 Ways To Assess A Company’s Culture During Your Job Search

3 Ways To Assess A Company’s Culture During Your Job Search

Now more than ever, it’s essential to understand a company’s culture before joining their team. According to a report by SHRM, in the last year, one in five Americans left a job due to poor company culture. Additionally, consumers are holding brands accountable. In a recent COVID-19 brand trust report, 90% of people believe brands must do everything they can to protect their employees’ and suppliers’ well-being and financial security. So, it won’t cut it anymore to simply provide a competitive salary. But how can you determine the company’s culture during your job search? Start with these three ways.

Do Your Research

Now, with the presence of social media, it’s easier than ever to get a picture of a company’s culture. Check out their LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Don’t forget to explore employee profiles too! Additionally, browse company reviews on Glassdoor or Google to get an idea of what past and current employees think. (Just remember to take reviews with a grain of salt!) And, if any red flags come up, be sure to address them during your interview.

Observe

If you go in person for an interview, be sure to observe everything around you. Do the other employees seem friendly and happy to be at work? What does the office look like? You want to keep an eye out for how people are dressed, office cleanliness, and updated equipment. As you observe, try to picture yourself as an employee. Does it seem like a place you could see yourself working?

Ask The Right Questions

When the interviewer turns it back around to you, have a couple of great questions at the ready. You want to go beyond the obvious, “what’s the company culture here?” in order to paint a complete picture of the team and company culture. Here are a few of our favorites (and what to listen for in an answer):

Tell Me About A Recent Team Win.

When the interviewer answers this question, you want to hear them celebrate wins, both big and small. Additionally, a hiring manager should give recognition to the team members involved.

How Does The Department Handle Conflict?

Conflict is bound to come up in team environments. However, it’s all about how the leadership handles it. Ideally, they will have a process in place to address inner-team conflict. The answer you don’t want to hear is, “we don’t have conflict.” Chances are, they are avoiding it, or team members don’t feel comfortable sharing any conflicts with their manager!

Are There Opportunities For Development?

Development opportunities are a great indicator of a supportive and encouraging work culture. If companies give their employees the chance to grow their skills and move up in the company, they will invest in your success.

In the end, there’s actually quite a bit you can learn from about a company’s culture from the outside. You just have to know what to look for! Another great way to understand company culture is to partner with a recruiting firm like Johnson Service Group. We have exclusive relationships with hiring managers and get all of the insider information that you need. Ready to get started? Explore our jobs or contact a recruiter today!

Questions to Ask During an Initial Interview

Questions to Ask During an Initial Interview

The initial interview, often over the phone, is one of the most critical stages in the hiring process. It is typically your first interaction with the hiring team, and a solid first impression is crucial! Thus, you must prepare for this interview like any other – research the company, know the job description like it’s the back of your hand, practice answering common interview questions, and prepare a list of questions to ask your interviewer. Here are some of the best questions to ask during an initial interview to leave a firm first impression and gain insight into the position.

When are you looking to make a hiring decision?

Asking this question will give you a better understanding of when the company is looking to make a hiring decision. This question can help if you are entertaining multiple job offers and looking for a timetable when you can expect them to decide on a candidate. Understanding the hiring decision timetable also provides insight on when to follow up if you have not heard back yet. If you a decision is expected to be made by a specific date, this will help you determine when it is appropriate to follow up with the hiring team on their decision.

What changes has the company made during the pandemic?

This question is vital to ask during an initial interview. It will reveal how the company acted during an uncertain time and what changes they made to keep their employees safe. Understanding how the company reacted to this challenging time will help you determine if this is the right match for your needs in a future employer. This question can also give some insight into how this position or company has changed during the pandemic. Will you be working onsite 100% of the time? Or are there work-from-home days to offer added flexibility?

What will mark success in the first 90 days?

Another excellent question to ask during an initial interview is how they will measure success in the first three months of your employment. The hiring team’s answer will help you determine if their expectations are realistic and understand what they anticipate from you. If the company has unrealistic expectations for the role in question, it may be a red flag. On the other hand, the answers to this question can allow you to speak on some of your past accomplishments; you can explain how these achievements can help tackle these benchmarks at the beginning of this new position. Basically, this gives you an opportunity to run for the hills or sell yourself on why you are the right person for this job.

Who will I work with most closely within this position?

If the interviewer doesn’t provide any details on the team makeup or who you will be working with, this is a great question to ask. Asking who you will be working with will help you know how collaborative this role is. Will you have a ton of independence and autonomy in this role? Will you be working with teams across different departments on projects? Learning about the team dynamic will help you determine if this role is a good fit for your working style.

Ready to take on a new job opportunity?

These are a few of the questions you can ask in an initial interview to clarify any unknowns about the position. Are you ready to put your interviewing skills to the test? Browse our latest job opportunities and partner with us today! We have hundreds of exciting positions across North America. If you are not ready yet, here are some more resources to help you excel through the hiring process.

How To Assess An Employer During A Remote Hiring Process

How To Assess An Employer During A Remote Hiring Process

During a traditional hiring process, one where you interview with a prospective employer in person, it is pretty easy to get a feel for the company. You get to see how co-workers interact with each other, what the office environment is like, and get a general feeling for the company. However, with most interviewing processes becoming remote, it can be challenging to understand these things and evaluate if this company is a good fit. If you are trying to determine if a company you are interviewing with is a good match, here is how to assess an employer during a remote hiring process.

Do your due diligence

Before you even apply for a job, take some time to do your due diligence for the company. Check out their website and read their mission, vision, and any information you can find about their culture. You can typically find this information on “about us” or “career” pages. See if they have a blog or social media to find some behind-the-scenes posts about their team. You may even get some great examples of how their team interacts or bonds with one another while working remotely. 

If you want some examples of the company’s culture from the horse’s mouth, take a look at company reviews. You can find reviews from current and past employees on sites like Glassdoor, Indeed, and Google. Take a few minutes to read some reviews and see what employees are commenting about their culture.

Ask specific questions during your interview

One of the best ways to get a feel for a company during a remote hiring process is to ask specific questions. You will likely have some questions you want to ask the hiring manager or recruiter after doing your research. Write these down and prepare yourself to ask them during your interview (if they don’t already come up naturally). These questions must be specific to be effective. If you ask cookie-cutter questions like “what is your company culture like?”, you will get generic answers. Ask questions about the things that matter to you – the aspects of an employer that will impact your decision to work there or not.

Here are a few good example questions you can ask:

  • What was the most significant obstacle your company had to overcome after the pandemic hit?
  • How does your team remain close, even when working remotely?
  • How has your company culture changed with parts of the team working remotely?
  • What does the team do for fun with the lack of in-person activities?

Pay attention to what you can

With a remote hiring process, it is more challenging to pick up on red flags or cues. However, as you navigate through the process, you have to pay close attention to what you can. Observe body language during virtual interviews to gauge the excitement of the team and hiring manager. Are they excited to meet with you and have positive energy? Or does everyone seem disengaged and act as they’d rather be anywhere else? Interviews are serious interactions, but that doesn’t mean you can’t determine if the team gets along well with each other and has fun.

Looking for more job search tips?

These are three ways you can assess an employer during a remote hiring process. If you are looking for more job-search advice, take a moment to review our candidate resources! We have hundreds of useful tips to help you excel through your job search. Or, if you are ready to find a new opportunity that’s right for you, take a look at our job board.