Designer
customized staffing solutions
Temporary Contract Staffing.
Direct-Hire Staffing.
Temp-to-hire staffing.
project management consulting services.
payroll services.
IT consulting services.

WE WORK HARD. WE WORK TOGETHER. WE WORK FOR YOU.

Designer
customized staffing solutions
Temporary Contract Staffing.
Direct-Hire Staffing.
Temp-to-hire staffing.
project management consulting services.
payroll services.
IT consulting services.

WE WORK HARD. WE WORK TOGETHER. WE WORK FOR YOU.

Designer
customized staffing solutions
Temporary Contract Staffing.
Direct-Hire Staffing.
Temp-to-hire staffing.
project management consulting services.
payroll services.
IT consulting services.

WE WORK HARD. WE WORK TOGETHER. WE WORK FOR YOU.

Designer
customized staffing solutions
Temporary Contract Staffing.
Direct-Hire Staffing.
Temp-to-hire staffing.
project management consulting services.
payroll services.
IT consulting services.

WE WORK HARD. WE WORK TOGETHER. WE WORK FOR YOU.

Designer
customized staffing solutions
Temporary Contract Staffing.
Direct-Hire Staffing.
Temp-to-hire staffing.
project management consulting services.
payroll services.
IT consulting services.

WE WORK HARD. WE WORK TOGETHER. WE WORK FOR YOU.


If you’re an employer, navigating the labor market can be challenging. But at Johnson Service Group, we are here to simplify things. Here is a collection of hiring process recommendations, overviews of the current landscape of the labor market, industry news, and much more. At JSG, we work hard, we work together, and we work for you.

How to Retain Employees When It’s Never Been Easier to Quit

How to Retain Employees When It’s Never Been Easier to Quit

With remote work becoming a permanent option for many companies, quitting a job has never been easier. With most or all of your staff working from home or at least in a hybrid environment, it’s more challenging for employees to feel engaged with a new job. If you start a new job working remotely, it’s difficult to establish relationships with your colleagues, and you can adopt an “easy-come, easy-go” attitude. Without forming in-person connections with your co-workers, it takes some feelings away when deciding to leave for another opportunity. So, with remote work not going anywhere, what can your company do to retain your employees?

Expand your leadership team

With new policy and technological changes resulting from working from home, you may need to add a new leadership role. We are still navigating uncharted waters with new issues arising every day as we work from home during the pandemic. As a result, it may be time to add a new position to your team: Director of Remote Work. Facebook added this new position at the end of 2020 to help with the transition of becoming a more remote-friendly company. The creation of this position was to ensure an equitable and supportive environment for team members across the board. Now, this person doesn’t have to be in a director-level role; however, it can be beneficial to create a position responsible for improving your employees’ remote work experience.

Reshaping your company culture

Another way to combat employees from jumping ship while working from home is to reshape your company culture. You can implement a few initiatives to build engagement with your staff and help them develop that connection and sense of commitment to their team. For example, you can encourage your staff to share pictures or stories to help your workers get to know each other a little better. Our team at JSG just shared a collection of our kids’ (and grandkids’) back-to-school photos! This activity was a fun way to get to know some of our co-workers and share an essential piece of their lives. Other ways to bolster your company culture while working remote are establishing no-meeting days, scheduling regular check-ins with your team, and fun competitions.

Encourage communication from leadership

Additionally, to help retain your staff during this unprecedented time, you should encourage more communication from your leadership team. A recent survey revealed that 30% of remote workers believe employers can improve their culture by increasing communication from leaders. During times like these, it’s even more critical for your leadership team to make themselves available and communicate what’s going on with the company. Whether it’s upcoming policy changes, new regulations, or just sharing their support, leaders must speak up during these trying times. A little communication can go a long way with your staff and make them feel more appreciated.

JSG is here to help

Those are three changes your team can make to retain employees when it’s never been easier to quit. If you are still struggling to find qualified candidates that will stick around, reach out to our recruiting team! We will work with you to source candidates that will be compatible with your team and won’t unexpectedly jump ship.

Try Asking Candidates These 3 Personal Interview Questions

Try Asking Candidates These 3 Personal Interview Questions

 Trying to get the complete picture of someone in a quick hour-long interview can be extremely difficult. Many hiring managers spend most of this time assessing a candidate’s qualifications and work history. So much so that after you’ve left the interview, you might find yourself feeling like you actually know nothing about the candidate at all. This can be especially true with virtual interviews. When interviewing over video chat, you can miss out on some of the natural rapport and back-and-forth conversation that comes so freely in person. If you want to get to know candidates a little better, try asking these three personal interview questions during your next hiring session. Not necessarily to get a specific answer, but to lighten the mood, break down barriers, and get a glimpse into your candidate’s personality.

What Have You Binged Watched Lately? 

During COVID-19 lockdowns, many of us invested copious amounts of time bonding with Netflix. Most candidates will have an answer at the ready. It’s important to note that there is NO right or wrong answer to this question (and let your candidate know that!). At best, it’s an opportunity for you to bond over something you’ve both watched; and at worst, it will help your candidate feel more comfortable in the interview to talk about something they enjoy.

Do You Listen to Podcasts? Which Ones Are Your Favorite? 

Podcasts have been growing in popularity during recent years. In 2021, 57% of Americans have listened to a podcast. As a result, there is a podcast on just about every single topic on the planet. Again, there is no right or wrong answer here! If a candidate doesn’t listen to podcasts, take the opportunity to share one of your favorites. If they do, take note of which ones they like and why they enjoy them. Is it a silly topic used as a way to unwind after work? Maybe something personal development-related that gets them inspired? Or is it relevant to their passions like sports? No matter what, this personal interview question is a great way to open doors to further conversation.

What’s An Accomplishment You’re Especially Proud Of? (Work-Related Or Not) 

When you ask this question, many people’s first instinct is to jump to a professional accomplishment. However, we encourage you to push beyond that. Work-life balance is of the utmost importance to modern candidates, and they undoubtedly have personal achievements they are proud of. Maybe they learned a new hobby, take on home renovations in their free time, or just worked really hard to get where they are. Hearing these personal accomplishments will give you great insights into who this candidate is and what is most important to them!

Need more personal interview question inspiration?

Are you looking for more personal interview questions to ask your applicants? Explore our hiring resources here!

What Are Job Seekers Looking for in 2021 and Beyond?

What Are Job Seekers Looking for in 2021 & Beyond?

Labor Day and the unofficial end of summer are (shockingly) just around the corner. As the last quarter of the year creeps upon us, many Americans are turning their attention beyond last-minute summer activities. According to the Pulse of the American Worker Survey: Special Report, 26% of all workers plan to look for a new job opportunity this year. This is encouraging for many employers looking to add new talent to their teams before the end of the year; however, to attract these job seekers during the Great Resignation, you must understand what they are looking for in a new role.

Remote work is no longer a benefit

The pandemic has made it clear that the majority of workers value remote work in some capacity. In fact, 87% of workers would like to work from home at least one day a week after the pandemic wanes. In other words, remote work is no longer a benefit, it’s a necessity for many workers. If your company is not supporting this demand, your candidate pool may fizzle out quickly.

Working from home still gets a bad rap by many employers. Some hiring managers believe that their workers are not as productive working from home or that it’s hard to collaborate. And this is likely true in some circumstances, but most employers ironed out these concerns over the last 18+ months. But with 1 in 3 workers not wanting to work for an employer that requires them to be onsite full-time, it may be time to rethink your post-pandemic workplace.

Why do workers want remote work?

Therefore, it’s clear that workers value remote work and will be looking for new opportunities that offer more flexibility. So, as an employer, it’s imperative to understand why workers care so much about it. According to the same survey, workers desire remote work for numerous reasons, including saving money, saving time (by not commuting), more time with family, better sleep, and improved health and stress levels. These are all great reasons why your team should be supporting remote work in some capacity.

Job seekers want a caring culture

Another aspect job seekers in today’s market are concerned with is healthy company culture. This desire is nothing new to employers, and many companies have been working diligently to foster a more inclusive culture in recent years. However, cultivating a caring culture can be a little more challenging with a hybrid workforce. Currently, 45% of workers still feel disconnected from their employer while working from home. According to respondents of this survey, culture in a remote environment can be improved by:

  • Companies offering remote-work resources
  • Updating company policies to reflect current times
  • More communication from the leadership team

These are three essential changes your team can make to develop a better company culture, even as some teammates continue to work remotely.

Are you looking for more hiring resources?

Those are the key things job seekers are looking for in new job opportunities. If you are looking for more ways to offer a better working experience and attract new talent, review our Client Resources!

How to Foster Company Culture While Working from Home

How to Foster Company Culture While Working from Home

Establishing an inclusive, strong company culture has become a priority in recent years for many companies. When the job market was scorching hot a few years back, employers looked for ways to reshape their culture to retain their best team players and attract new job seekers. But as millions of people are working from home, it’s become even more challenging to nurture culture. And as many remote workers begin to feel burnt out and isolated, it’s crucial to confront this issue head-on. Here is how your team can foster a strong company culture while your staff is working from home.

Virtual activities

When everyone is in the office, synergy and teamwork are more natural. Your team can plan office parties, go to happy hours after work, and do other exercises that cultivate culture. But just because the bulk of your team is working remotely, it doesn’t mean that you can’t organize similar activities. You can schedule virtual activities to give your team a break from work and have a little fun. A recent article from the New York Times illustrated that some smaller businesses were doing virtual movie nights, online games, and some in-person outdoor events. These virtual activities are a fun way for your staff to have a little fun, build chemistry with one another, and feel like they are part of a team.

Zoom fatigue is real, and it’s causing some remote workers anxiety. Another excellent strategy some employers are endorsing is meeting-free days. Blocking out one day a week where no meetings are allowed so your team can focus on their work without constant interruptions is a great way to ease the pressure off your staff and improve your company’s culture.

Share stories and pictures

At this point, most of you probably have your cameras turned off during video calls. You probably haven’t seen some of your coworkers for months (or even longer). When you are not physically together, you can miss out on some water cooler conversations. As a result, it can be difficult to keep up with what’s going on with your colleagues outside of work. An easy strategy to remedy this is to encourage your staff to share pictures and stories. Did someone just have a baby? What were your pandemic projects that you proudly finished? Developed any new hobbies over the last 18+ months? These are all things that are fun to share with each other virtually! So, whether it’s a staff newsletter or a fun Slack channel, sharing stories and pictures with your colleagues is a great way to cultivate culture.

Our team at JSG all submitted our work from home pictures at the beginning of the pandemic. Check them out here!

Friendly competitions

Who doesn’t love a friendly competition? These competitions can be work-related or just for fun. Football season is coming up, so creating a company fantasy football league is a great way to have a little fun and bond with your coworkers. Your programming team can do a virtual hackathon, or you can host a trivia night with some fun questions about your company, industry, or products. You can even do costume competitions for Halloween (which is spookily just around the corner). Whatever your team decides, creating some friendly competitions is an excellent way to build company culture while your team is working from home.

Regular check-ins

Last but not least, your team can schedule regular check-ins with your staff to gauge how they are doing. When working from home, it can sometimes be more challenging to have one-on-one conversations with your team. Regularly checking in to see how they are doing and understand what you and the company can do to support them will go a long way. Your staff will ultimately be better-taken care of and appreciated. Plus, you will learn new ways to help them do their jobs better and provide a healthier work-life balance.

Those are four ways you can foster a more robust company culture while working from home. If you are looking for more ways to support your staff and offer a better experience, check out our Client Resources!

How To Properly Reject Candidates

How To Properly Reject Candidates (With Examples)

You’re hiring, and congratulations, you found the perfect candidate! You send them an offer letter, they accept, and you start the onboarding process. But hang on just a second; your job is not finished! There were dozens, maybe even hundreds, of other people who invested time and energy into your job posting. And you owe them an explanation. Unfortunately, “ghosting” candidates has become all too common practice. In fact, a whopping 65% of people said they have not heard back from a position they applied for recently. Leaving candidates ‘on read’ is not only just wrong, but it can also have a significant effect on your company’s reputation. So, here are the steps your hiring team should take to properly reject candidates to maintain your reputation and be respectful to everyone’s time.

Contact Everyone 

Yes, we mean every single person that applied. You have to consider that everyone who applied for your job took valuable time out of their day to do so. And many went to the lengths of customizing their resume, writing a cover letter or personalizing a submission email. The very least you can do is give them the courtesy of a response! If your hiring team did not have a conversation with a candidate or they didn’t make it to the initial interview round, a simple rejection template is acceptable. When you, unfortunately, have to reject candidates, keep it short and sweet:

Hi John, 

Thank you so much for taking the time to apply for the Account Executive position at ABC Company. We received numerous applications for this role, and at this time, we have decided not to move forward with other candidates. Please note that we have saved your application on file and will contact you regarding future positions that fit your skill sets!

We wish you the best in your current job search and future endeavors.

Sincerely, 

The Hiring Team at ABC Company 

Send Personalized Messages to Those You Interviewed 

While we recommend that you contact any rejected interviewees by phone, we understand that this is not always possible due to time constraints. If you must send an email, take the time to personalize it. Of course, it’s standard to start with a template, but there are opportunities to reference your interactions with the candidate throughout. Mention some of their qualifications that stood out, a question they answered particularly well, or even a hobby you might have had in common.

Hi Jane,

Thank you so much for taking the time to interview for our Account Executive position at ABC Company. We loved having the opportunity to get to know you and hear more about your experience in the field. I was especially impressed by your sales numbers from last year; you are certainly a go-getter! Unfortunately, we received dozens of qualified applications, and we have made the difficult decision to proceed with another candidate at this time.

Please note that we have saved your application on file and will contact you regarding any future positions that become available!

We wish you the best in your current job search and future endeavors.

Sincerely, 

The Hiring Team at ABC Company

86% of job seekers want constructive feedback about their performance, but only 57% receive any. Thus, as your reject candidates that didn’t quite fit the bill, you can set yourself apart by providing them with feedback.

Be Timely When You Reject Candidates

Most importantly, be timely in sending your rejections to candidates. As soon as you know you will not offer the position to someone, you should send the rejection. As mentioned above, these people have invested time and energy into applying with your company and should be given the opportunity to move on to their next application as soon as possible. We do not recommend waiting until your new employee starts or even until they have accepted the offer. If, by some chance, your primary choice ends up pulling out at some point, your backup candidates will have much more respect for you if you reach back out than if you left them hanging.

Need more hiring advice in this tight market?

So, that’s how your hiring team can properly reject candidates while maintaining your company’s reputation. Are you interested in stepping up your hiring game even further? Explore our client resources here and talk to one of our experienced team members about how we can carry the burden of candidate communication while you focus on what you do best.

The Perks Your Employees Actually Care About

The Perks Your Employees Actually Care About

While hunting for a new job, you may have seen companies offer some unordinary or even bizarre perks. Whether that is unlimited snacks, regular happy hours, or a gaming center, these perks may sound attractive, but they’re not precisely what job seekers desire. Recent studies have revealed that employees 35 years old and under place more value on respect than these “fun” benefits. But what exactly do job seekers (and your current staff members) care about when it comes to job perks? Here are four perks that employees actually care about and why they are important to them. 

Health insurance

One of the most important perks employees care about is their insurance plans. Although this may sound dull, attractive insurance policies are the best way to care for your employees. Insurance plans can be costly with lackluster coverages. Offering solid insurance plans with partial or complete contributions, especially after a global pandemic, is quickly becoming a high priority for employees. Insurance plans that support medical, dental, and vision plans are a huge plus. This perk may not be as quirky and fun as an office ping pong table in the break room but is by far one that your employees actually care about.

Professional Development

Another great perk your employees care about is an investment in professional development. Just because employees graduated college with a degree doesn’t mean there isn’t more to learn. Most of your staff wish to acquire more skills, earn new certifications and training, and become better, more well-rounded people. These perks can also make your employees better assets to your company by gaining more valuable skills that help them excel in their positions. So, it is safe to say that investing in your people through professional development initiatives is an excellent way to keep your staff feeling happy and fulfilled.

Work Flexibility 

If there was one thing employees learned from COVID-19 is that being flexible is the new norm. This pandemic has also caused an urge from employees to have more work flexibility in their jobs as we look to the future. A recent poll shows 78% of people believe having work flexibility options is one of the most appealing perks to have within a job. This can include work-from-home options, hybrid schedules, mental health daysor other accommodations. Offering flexible working environments is one of the best ways to take care of your employees (and attract new job seekers to your organization!).

Other Basic Perks

It’s essential to offer meaningful perks, like the ones mentioned above; however, there are plenty of basic perks your team can offer that can be just as fulfilling for many employees. Developing robust PTO policies and encouraging your staff to take advantage of them is an excellent incentive for employees to stick around. Even fostering a better overall work environment and healthy company culture can make a significant difference. Building a desirable workplace includes effective leadership and strong communication. Finally, offering competitive compensation can also help incentivize employees to be more effective at their jobs. These perks are not too crazy but provide attractive incentives to make your staff feel more appreciated and respected.

Still not Perk-fect? 

Perks can be hard to design and implement, especially since there are so many factors to consider. Here at JSG, we want to provide you with the best tools to help you implement successful hiring strategies. If your hiring team is searching for more advice to keep your staff satisfied, review our Client Resources! We have tons of helpful tips and tricks to boost your employee retention rates and foster a better working environment.

Should Companies Pay Candidates for Their Time?

Should Companies Pay Candidates for Their Time?

Should companies pay candidates to interview for their open positions? According to career coach and business author Sue Ellson, candidates should receive compensation for interviewing. And based on a recent LinkedIn News poll, 25% of respondents currently agree. Job interviews ask a lot from applicants, including phone screenings, panel interviews, aptitude tests, and even taking time from work. And let’s be honest, some company’s hiring processes can take weeks or even months before they make a decision. Ellson’s argument is, “if there’s money in it, it might make everybody more accountable.” Basically, Ellson points out that if employers paid candidates for their time, it would cut down on wasteful interview activities and streamline the process.

However, before companies resort to paying candidates for their time spent interviewing, here are three other ways employers can improve their hiring processes and offer a better candidate experience.

Be transparent with candidates

Transparency throughout the hiring process will go a long way. Sharing details such as your company’s perks, WFH/hybrid policy, or even providing the salary range will significantly improve the interviewing experience and save all parties time, money, and opportunity costs. Transparency starts with the job description. You can share details often left out, such as benefits, salary range, perks, and insights into your company’s culture. These details are important to applicants and will help you narrow down your candidate pool before you even start interviewing. By sharing these features from the beginning, you will naturally weed out job seekers looking for something else. Plus, it will save both parties substantial amounts of time and resources.

Also, you can demonstrate transparency by sharing details such as the steps in the interviewing process and the hiring decision timetable. This clarity creates accountability for your hiring team to stay on track while informing candidates on the next steps of the process.

Streamline your hiring process

After your hiring team bolsters your transparency, it’s time to identify areas to simplify your company’s hiring process. Take a look at the last couple of years and calculate your time to fill (TTF) for your open positions. According to SHRM, the average time to fill is 42 days. This timeframe will depend on your industry, but if your company’s average TTF is well beyond this benchmark, it’s time to improve your process. You can do this by identifying steps that need to be restructured or even eliminated altogether. You can do this by transitioning to virtual interviews, using an ATS system to identify the most qualified applicants, or removing an entire step in your process. However you choose to streamline your hiring process, these actions will significantly improve your candidate experience.

Provide feedback to candidates

Finally, if you want to improve your candidate experience, you can provide feedback to your interviewees after the hiring process. It is very rare for a hiring manager to give feedback to candidates. Typically, applicants will receive a vague, auto-generated email when they are passed on. If a candidate wants feedback, they usually have to request it from the hiring manager, and it’s a toss-up if they ever receive a response.

So, if you want to show your appreciation for your interviewees’ time, take a moment to give them some feedback. Was a candidate missing a particular skill set? Did they not do a great job answering a specific question? Whatever the feedback is, take a few moments to share your thoughts, and it will go a long way. Providing some input will give your candidates valuable information to improve their odds of receiving an offer in the future.

Not interested in paying candidates to interview?

So, do you think that companies should pay candidates for their time spent interviewing? This is obviously a provocative idea, but it definitely should make you think about what you, as an employer, can do to improve your candidate experience. And if you are looking for more ways to streamline your hiring process, check out our client resources! There are hundreds of helpful tools, tips, and advice to build a better strategy for your hiring team.

Here’s What Candidates Expect Post-COVID-19

Here’s What Candidates Expect Post-COVID-19

In 2020, life as we know it was completely turned upside down. Everything we knew about our careers, hiring, and job searching changed on a dime. Now that things are finally stabilizing, we realize how much we’ve been permanently affected. The job market is picking back up and becoming increasingly competitive for highly qualified candidates. And these candidates come with some lofty post-COVID-19 expectations. Here’s how the Coronavirus has shifted candidate perspectives and changed their priorities.

Job Flexibility

Job flexibility is the number one thing candidates will be looking for in a post-COVID-19 workforce. In fact, according to a Workforce Confidence survey from LinkedIn, 50% of respondents say that flexibility of hours or location has become more important to them. This change is notable because as recently as 2017, flexibility wasn’t even on the candidate’s radar. The shift in 2020 showed workers and managers alike that work flexibility could be an asset rather than an obstacle. Because although people are working longer, more productive hours, they are simultaneously reporting higher happiness and productivity levels.

Work-Life Balance  

Tying in with job flexibility is a work-life balance. Generally, a more flexible work schedule and environment have allowed for a better work-life balance, so it makes sense that 45% of people will be prioritizing this in their job search. Over the past year, people have discovered the freedom of balancing their family and home life with work. We have proved that it is possible and that it contributes to a more productive workforce overall. However, this is not new information. A 2009 survey found that people who are happy with their work-life benefits work 21% harder and are 33% more likely to plan to stay at that organization. Therefore, in the post-Covid-19 job market, most employees expect this work-life balance to continue in the form of a hybrid work schedule.

Health Coverage  

It’s no surprise that a global pandemic has made people reconsider their medical benefits. Now, 41% of respondents list health coverage as important to them, whereas a few years ago, it didn’t even break the top five priorities of workers. Moving forward, companies can attract top candidates by offering competitive health coverage that puts employees’ needs first.

Pay  

One priority that stands the test of time is pay. Most recently, 36% of people cited pay as an essential job factor. A fair and competitive wage will always be crucial and should be a primary consideration for hiring managers. Even in a candidate-saturated market, it’s a guaranteed way to build a solid, loyal workforce.

Workforce Culture  

Workforce culture has been on the rise of candidate priorities over the last few years. However, due to recent diversity initiatives and the prioritization of an inclusive workforce, it has changed a lot recently. 36% of survey respondents listed it as necessary, but what does that mean? Where “culture fit” used to be cited in reference to excluding candidates, it has now pivoted to be inclusive. Candidates are looking for companies that prioritize building a diverse team that values all opinions and backgrounds. Additionally, companies that go above and beyond to bolster marginalized communities and professionals will garner the attention they deserve.

These post-Covid-19 perspectives are permanent

There is no arguing that the pandemic has changed the world as we know it. Priorities for companies and candidates are shifting, but for the better. As we work to establish our “new normal,” the workforce will look different as we continue experimenting and learning.

Are you interested in more workforce insights and hiring advice? Get a peek into our client resources here.

How to Streamline Your Virtual Hiring Process

How to Streamline Your Virtual Hiring Process

As business operations continue to reopen and return to somewhat normal, employers are ramping up their hiring efforts. If your company was actively interviewing and hiring candidates during the pandemic, you undoubtfully had to change your hiring strategy. As many of us transition back to the office (or a hybrid schedule), video interviewing is becoming permanent. About 81% of talent professionals worldwide agree that virtual interviewing will continue post-pandemic, and 70% believe it will become the new standard. So, if your company is maintaining a virtual hiring process, how do you streamline it to get the best results?

Establish a cohesive virtual hiring process

As you navigate today’s competitive (and often frustrating) job market, you must establish a cohesive virtual hiring process. This new protocol will likely be a mix of your pre-pandemic hiring efforts and your more recent practices that you had to adjust while working remotely. Essentially, you want to create a standardized process that you can consistently utilize across your entire company. Once you establish this process, you want to document it and make it available to all hiring managers. The more transparent your new process is, the smoother the transition will be across the board.

Test necessary technologies

Like we recommend to all job seekers, you must test the technologies you will be enlisting to implement your virtual hiring process. If you worked remotely for over a year, you probably had your Microsoft Teams, Zoom, or other technologies dialed in. However, if you are back in the office, it’s best to reexamine your tools to ensure everything is working properly. Technology is great when it works, but you may face some kinks with your communication tools when returning to the office. Review all your technologies and run some tests before conducting any video interviews to ensure a seamless experience for both parties.

Be transparent with candidates from the beginning

Being transparent throughout your virtual hiring process is essential to its success. From outlining your remote work policy to detailing your timetable of making a hiring decision, it’s crucial to be transparent with candidates. The fewer questions that are left unanswered, the better experience you will create for your interviewees. You can clarify many of these issues in your job descriptions. Giving a glimpse of your culture, remote work requirements, and other details before candidates even apply generates a substantial competitive advantage. For example, if you are not supporting a hybrid workforce, you can save yourself (and prospective applicants) a lot of valuable time by outlining that in your job description. The more details you can share at the begging of the process, the more efficient it will be.

Develop standardized interview questions

Have you ever been to a panel interview, and each interviewer takes turns monotonously asking a list of basic questions? Yeah, most of us have. While we are not recommending such a dry interviewing process, it is essential to develop standardized interview questions. Obviously, some of these questions may differ from department to department, but having a core group of interview questions is key to success. Standardized questions will allow you to compare candidates on an equal playing field and help your hiring team eliminate any unconscious biases.

Pro tip: You can also record remote interviews so you can refer back to a candidate’s specific response or share with a colleague that may have had to step out unexpectedly. Just make sure you let each candidate know they are being recorded.

Treat candidates as if they were interviewing in-person

Treating candidates the same as if it was an in-person interview is probably the most vital step. Let’s face it, video conversations with someone you have never met before can be a little awkward. It can be challenging to develop some small talk or banter to make the interview more conversational. However, do your best to treat the interview as if it was face-to-face. Have everyone on the hiring team mute their phones and work notifications, dress appropriately, and eliminate any other distractions. It can be tempting to veer over to a work email while talking with a candidate. However, please give them the respect they deserve by devoting your attention to them.

If you are struggling to make the interview more conversational, you can ask a few fun questions at the beginning. These ice breaker questions will help the interviewer be more comfortable and help them open up a bit. Also, body language is crucial! Don’t forget to smile, make good eye contact, and nod your head to illustrate that you are listening. Your interviewees will reciprocate this energy, and the interview will overall be more productive.

Need more help developing your virtual hiring process?

Transitioning to a virtual hiring process can be tricky, but these five tips will help your streamline your process and yield better results. If you are looking for more tips to improve your hiring practices, take a look at our Client Resources!

The One Big Problem with Hybrid Work

The One Big Problem with Hybrid Work

If the pandemic has taught us anything over the last 18+ months is that remote work is here to stay. Even the companies long opposed to working from home opportunities have found value in supporting a remote workforce. According to data from LinkedIn, 87% of employees want to remain remote most of the time. With only 13% of employees desiring to be in the office the majority of the time, employers must offer hybrid working models to attract new employees. However, there is one big problem with hybrid work that has been prevalent (and surprising to many): working from home is damaging many people’s work-life balance.

Remote work job openings are increasing

Like many others, you probably expected remote work to plateau as COVID-19 restrictions lifted and our lives slowly returned to normal. Surprisingly, the opposite is occurring. Over the last 12 months (from May 2021 to 2020), remote job openings grew by 240% globally. As a result, total job posts with words like “remote” or “work from home” now account for almost 14% of total job openings. This is a massive jump and is changing the future of recruiting strategies for most employers.

Work-life balance continues to be an issue

In the early days of the pandemic, many workers struggled with maintaining a healthy work-life balance. After working from home for nearly a year and a half, it can be more challenging to separate your work life from your home life. If you are one of these people, you are not alone. 32% of remote employees are more likely to struggle with work-life balance. That may surprise many employers as remote work eliminates many of the stresses that in-person working generates, such as traffic, long commutes, endless meetings, and many other things. However, burnout is on the rise, and with the quit rate at an all-time high, employers must be creative to improve their staff’s work-life balance.

Maintaining a hybrid workforce with a healthy work-life balance

If you are looking to attract (and retain) your remote workforce this summer, you are going to have to do your part to offer a healthy work-life balance.

Support their need to take time off

First of all, support your staff members and their need for time off. Many workers put off taking some much-needed R&R during the pandemic. As things continue to open up with restrictions lifting, your staff will be more likely to request some time off. Instead of making your workers feel bad about taking time off that they earned, support their need to step away from work for a few days or a long weekend. Some employers, like Bumble and LinkedIn, are even closing their doors for a week and giving all of their employees a paid week off. Whatever your PTO policy is, encourage your employees to use the time to relax and take a step away from work.

Regularly check in with your staff

Communication is essential when managing a hybrid workforce. Schedule one-on-one check-ins to see how they are handling their workload and watch for signs of burnout. If you don’t encourage open communication with your staff, it can be hard to pick up on cues of a poor work-life balance.

Optimize your hybrid work schedule

If you really want to support your staff in this new hybrid schedule, you can be more selective with the days they work from home and the days they work from the office. Depending on your industry and the role, some days may be more beneficial to work from home than others. Here are the best days to work from home for most employees to boost your work-life balance.