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3 Interview Questions You Should Ask Remote Work Candidates

3 Interview Questions You Should Ask Remote Work Candidates

It’s been nearly a year since the beginning of the pandemic where thousands of companies were forced to transition to a remote working environment. This transition is temporary for some employers, but many are permanently shifting operations to allow their staff to work from home. Regardless of which boat your company is in, you will eventually have to hire a new staff member on a remote basis. Hiring someone for a remote position takes a unique skill set and requires you to ask different interview questions to ensure candidates will be the right fit. You need to understand if they are reliable, flexible, and excellent communicators. Here are three interview questions you should ask remote work candidates.

Have you worked remotely in the past?

First of all, you want to understand in what capacity they have worked remotely in the past. Are they currently working remotely? Or are they considered an essential worker and able to work on-site? Shifting from working on-site to your home “office” is challenging, and you need to see if your prospective candidates are up for the task. You are looking for qualified candidates that fit the work style or environment. Understanding what capacity a candidate has worked from home is an excellent first step.

If a candidate has not worked remotely, that is not a dealbreaker. You will just want to look for qualities in their answers to understand if they fit that working style.

What types of communication tools have you used, and how did you use them?

Asking a candidate what type of communication tools they use will help you understand how they will virtually work with others. You want to see what tools they have used in the past and how they have used them to communicate. Clear communication while working from home is essential. They don’t necessarily have to have experience with the same tools your team uses. For example, skills with Microsoft Team will undoubtedly translate into using Zoom or Slack. Most importantly, is learning how they use these tools to work with others successfully and complete assignments.

How do you control your time management and remain organized?

Time management and organizational skills are crucial for remote workers. It is much easier to check in on workers when you physically share office space. However, when people work remotely, they have much more independence; candidates will be more responsible for managing their time and organization. Asking this question will allow you to understand how a prospective candidate keeps track of their time, prioritize their work, and stay organized throughout the day. Answers will differ from person to person. So, what you are looking for is that they have a thoughtful method for managing their time and staying focused.

Need more hiring input?

So, these are three basic interview questions you should ask remote work candidates to see if they are a strong fit for your team. If you need more help vetting candidates for remote assignments, reach out to our team at JSG. We can help you identify the candidates that will make an immediate impact on your team from the safety of their homes. Let’s work together!

The Easy 5-Step Strategy To Hire Remote Employees

The Easy 5-Step Strategy To Hire Remote Employees

Implementing a great hiring process is difficult enough, let alone a process to hire remote employees while your whole team is working remotely! Our best advice is to keep it simple. Focus on what matters, and let the rest fall away. For guidance, follow our easy 5-step strategy to hire remote employees.

Write A Great Job Description

It all starts with a great description. If there isn’t enough information in the job description, you will get an influx of unqualified resumes. On the other hand, if your job description includes a laundry list of complicated qualifications, you could deter talented candidates who don’t meet every single unnecessary qualification. For a remote position, be sure to detail the remote-work situation throughout, even if it’s just temporarily remote. You want that to pique the interest of the right candidates!

Additionally, use the job description to entice candidates. Share insight into your company culture, a glimpse into the day-to-day tasks, and information about benefits and perks. If it’s a permanent remote position, explain the support you provide to remote employees.

Define Your “Must-Haves”

In an incredibly competitive job market, you might receive hundreds of applications for one opening. Thus, it’s essential that you define your absolute must-have non-negotiables. Limit these to one or two of the most important qualities. That way, you can prioritize candidates that meet your most critical needs. For a remote position, this should include common remote work skills and experience.

Ask The Right Interview Questions

Now, more than ever, behavioral questions are instrumental to the hiring process. In the current job market, don’t be afraid to dig deep with candidates! Have them explain how they react to common remote work situations like frustrating Zoom calls, technology struggles, or unclear lines of communication. How they answer will be a great indicator of how they work remotely. Additionally, ask questions specific to your team or company culture to really cover all of your bases.

Check Their References

When you hire remote employees, it is entirely appropriate to request references that worked with them in a remote capacity. Making this specific request will grant you the opportunity to get a first-hand account of the candidate’s true ability to work remotely.

Extend An Offer Promptly

There are some incredible candidates on the market today; however, they won’t last long! Talent with remote work experience is in high demand, and your competition could sweep them out from under your feet. Make sure your interviews are effective so you can extend an offer and hire remote employees quickly.

Looking for more hiring advice? Explore our hiring resources here.