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jobs with the most demand

Jobs with the Most Demand in November

Another month down, another group of jobs in high demand. Once again, LinkedIn revealed the jobs that are in the fastest-growing demand this month. Although some jobs from the previous month continue to top the list, we see a new job with outrageous demand. Here is a closer look at the jobs with the most demand in November.

COVID-19 impacts tax season

There are two things guaranteed in life, and one of them is taxes. According to LinkedIn’s job posting data, job openings for Tax Specialists skyrocketed 579%. That is no surprise, as this year’s tax filing deadline was pushed back again to October 15th. Previously, the deadline was postponed from April to July, so we saw a similar spike this past summer. Taxes will be challenging for both companies and the American people, so Tax Specialists will be a hot commodity for months to come.

The holidays spur seasonal hiring

Retail positions remain in high demand as brick and mortar and online retailers ramp up their hiring efforts for the holidays. Retail Associates (+426%), Customer Representatives (+406%), and Merchandisers (+191%) were some of the jobs with the fastest-growing demand. This trend will likely continue into next month as holiday shopping picks up. With even more people relying on Ecommerce for their holiday shopping, there is a massive surge in Fulfillment Specialists (+184%) and Drivers (+155%).

Are more people traveling?

A new job cracked the top ten list: Automotive Technicians. In October, the demand for Automotive Techs jumped +177%, the eighth fastest-growing job in the month. This is likely due to more people traveling, a sign that people are feeling a little more optimistic about the pandemic. And while fewer people are commuting for traditional office jobs, food delivery companies experience a massive spike in business. Last month, Food Delivery Drivers were the sixth-most in-demand job. Thus, as more people utilize these services, vehicles will need maintenance. It will be interesting to watch this trend as more states impose stricter lockdown measures with rising coronavirus cases.

Need help sourcing for these roles?

So, these are the jobs with the fastest-growing demand in December. If you are searching for a new career path, consider exploring one of these roles. And if you are an employer that needs some assistance sourcing some talent for one of these positions (or any other role), reach out to us today. We work hard, we work together, and we work for you.

job market turned a new corner

Has the Job Market Turned A New Corner?

Is the job market turning over a new leaf? According to the Labor Department, more Americans voluntarily left their jobs in September than any other month since the pandemic. Despite the number of coronavirus cases skyrocketing, job openings are increasing, and the number of layoffs is declining. So, has the job market turned a new corner? Let’s take a closer look.

3 million voluntary quits

The US Department of Labor reported this week that the number of people who voluntarily quit their jobs increased to 3.0 million in September. That is the most voluntary quits in the last 7+ months. Additionally, the number of available jobs rose to 6.44 million, and layoffs and discharges decreased to 1.3 million (down 0.9%).

So, in what industries are people quitting their jobs? Increases in voluntary quits were noticeable in the accommodation and food services industry, construction, and professional and business services. The confidence with workers in these industries is also reflected in the latest Jobs Report, showing that these industries have the most significant employment rebounds.

A pandemic-low unemployment rate

The unemployment rate also hit a pandemic-era low last month of 6.9%, down 1% from September. The number of job gains also well surpassed economists’ predictions with the addition of 638,000 nonfarm payrolls. “The rebound continues to have strong momentum, more than people were thinking,” said John Briggs, head of strategy at NatWest Markets. “Private payrolls blowout, the participation rate went up 0.3… People are coming back into the economy, and [the unemployment rate] still went down a full percentage point.” The combination of more job openings and lower unemployment levels is a prominent indicator that the labor market is rebounding.

An unexpected startup boom

Moreover, in a surprising turn of events is a boom in American startups. Business applications crashed when the virus first hit, but the third quarter of 2020 produced the highest number of applications on record. So, as unemployment levels reached an all-time high, thousands of Americans put on their entrepreneurship hats. The largest area for new business formation is online retail, which is interesting because the coronavirus has crushed traditional brick-and-mortar retail.

However, will this spark in startup formations fill our country’s significant unemployment void? As of now, it looks like the job market is turning a new corner. Time will tell, but this boom of optimism is really refreshing as we quickly approach the end of the year.

October 2020 Jobs Report

October 2020 Jobs Report: 638,000 Jobs Added

According to the Labor Department, U.S. employers added 638,000 jobs last month, much than economists projected. This is the sixth month in a row of job gains as the country continues to recover from the pandemic. The unemployment rate also dropped to 6.9%, a whole percentage point lower than September’s rate. The positive results of this month’s report are primarily thanks to the decline in the number of temporary layoffs and a boost in seasonal hiring. Here is an overview of the October 2020 Jobs Report.

October 2020 Jobs Report Overview

U.S. employers are on a six-month streak of adding nonfarm payrolls. And with a massive decline in government workers due to the conclusion of the 2020 census, the Labor Department would have reported over 900,000 nonfarm payroll gains. “The 638,000 rise in nonfarm payrolls in October is stronger than it looks as it included a 147,000 drop in temporary Census employment and, alongside the big fall in the unemployment rate, it suggests that the labor market recovery still has plenty of momentum,” Andrew Hunter, senior U.S. economist for Capital Economics.

This month’s gains are a shock to many economists as the number of positive coronavirus cases continues to surpass daily records. On November 5th, the U.S. reported almost 117,000 new coronavirus cases. And although we have made significant strides in our country’s recovery, there are still 11.1 million unemployed persons (down 1.5 million from last month).

Workers are returning on-site

A noticeable shift in the October Jobs Report was the number of remote workers returning on-site. 21.2% of employees last month worked remotely because of the virus. That is slightly down from September’s rate of 22.7%. This trend will be interesting to watch going forward as the number of positive cases continues to climb. Regardless of this slight decline, millions of people are still working remotely, and hiring managers will have to continue to change their processes to attract them.

Job gains by industry

Last month, U.S. employers added 638,000 nonfarm payrolls. Noticeable job gains occurred in leisure and hospitality (+271,000), professional and business services (+208,000), retail trade (+104,000), construction (+84,000), healthcare and social assistance (+79,000), transportation and warehousing (+63,000), manufacturing (+38,000), financial activities (+31,000), and other services (+47,000). Employment in government fell by 268,000, mostly due to the loss of 147,000 2020 Census workers.

Revision from the previous jobs report

The Labor Department reported that total nonfarm payroll employment gains have increased in previous months. In August, payrolls were revised up by 4,000, from +1,489,000 to +1,493,000, and in September, payrolls were revised up by 11,000, from +661,000 to +672,000. With revisions over the last two months combined, employment was 15,000 more than previously reported.

Find the talent you need before year’s end

We have less than two months left of 2020 (thankfully); it’s time to start thinking about your hiring needs going into the new year. There are millions of talented workers on the market, and you don’t want to wait to scoop them up, or you will miss out. If your hiring team needs assistance navigating this challenging, ever-changing labor market, reach out to us today. We are here to help you start the new year off on the right foot.

workforce confidence

The Cities With The Highest (and Lowest) Workforce Confidence

The coronavirus has hit cities in waves. Some are thriving, while others are seeing a spike in cases, and as a result, a higher unemployment rate. Over the last eight long months, workers’ confidence in their finances, job stability, and long-term career prospects have fluctuated. LinkedIn’s most recent Workforce Confidence Index surveyed over 33,000 people across the country and examined their confidence in their current and future career outlooks. Here are the cities with the highest (and lowest) workforce confidence.

 The ten most confident cities

The workforce confidence for some cities is strong, with Colorado Springs, CO, Provo, UT, and Tampa, FL leading the way. Many of these top ten cities are in the Sunbelt, which is currently benefiting from steady population growth. These markets are emerging as logistics hubs with new construction, creating thousands of jobs, and attracting both employers and job seekers to these areas. An interesting note is that none of the cities in the top ten are major metro markets, such as New York City, Seattle, or LA.

Here are the top 10 most confident cities, according to LinkedIn:

workforce confidence

The ten least confident cities

On the other side of the coin, workforce confidence in larger, more industrial cities in the Midwest and Westside are feeling much less confident in their career outlooks. Tucson, AZ, Milwaukee, WI, and Las Vegas are cities with notable lower confidence ratings. These are all cities that are lagging behind the rest of the country’s recovery rates.

An intriguing note is that the least confident cities all have unemployment rates above the national average. For example, Nevada’s unemployment rate is 12.4%, which is no surprise given the tourism business generated by Las Vegas.

Here is a list of the least confident cities:

  • Tucson, AZ
  • Milwaukee, WI
  • Grand Rapids, MI
  • Las Vegas, NV
  • Chicago, IL
  • Cincinnati, OH
  • Portland, OR
  • Austin, TX
  • Orlando, FL
  • Sacramento, CA

Some states have a better environment for the pandemic

Naturally, some states were better suited to the social and economic changes that were brought on by the pandemic. One of these is a new trend in outdoor seating for bars and restaurants. Restaurants, pubs, and eateries can have a larger capacity, and therefore, more business with outside seating accommodations. This trend has forced many restaurants to shift their space to allow more outdoor seating. However, with cold weather well on its way, it will be harder for some cities to continue this trend. As a result, this will make it harder for some of these local businesses to survive.

In the end, this list will fluctuate as some cities and states overcome the obstacles caused by the pandemic better than others. It will be interesting to see how these cities adjust in the fourth quarter and into the new year.

jobs with most demand

Jobs with The Most Demand in October

As we are now well into the last quarter of 2020 and with the holiday season lurking around the corner, new waves of jobs are in high demand in October. With holiday sales such as Prime Day already in full swing, hiring pushes for essential workers will keep growing. Here are the jobs with the most demand in October.

The jobs with the most demand in October

As retailers and big shopping giants prepare for the influx of foot traffic brought by holiday shopping, security officers and retail sales specialists are in huge demand. According to LinkedIn, security officers are the fastest-growing job this month with a month-to-month increase of 361%. Retail sales specialists are the third fastest-growing positions with a growth rate of 144%.

Delivery specialists are the second fastest-growing job this month, with a growth rate of 176%. This spike is no surprise as postal workers and other distribution companies like UPS and FedEx beef up their staff for a surge in online purchases.

Also, employers are doubling down on their digital-first strategies as we are now 7+ months into the pandemic. Application developers (+69%), SEO specialists (+37%), and translation specialists (+34%) are all in high demand as companies look for new ways to reach consumers online.

Healthcare positions continue to grow

Before the pandemic, the healthcare industry was one of the fastest-growing business sectors, which hasn’t changed in 2020. According to Indeed, seven of the most in-demand jobs this month are healthcare-related. These include home health aides, nurses, physical therapy professionals, medical technologists, and health services administrators. LinkedIn’s job postings echo this trend with registered nurses becoming the job with the second-largest demand. This trend has obviously been active throughout the pandemic as healthcare professionals are in desperate need.

Are you searching for a new job?

If you are on the job market, it can be overwhelming. Job searching is a stressful process, and our current economic circumstances are not making your search any easier. If you feel stuck in the mud, why not try working with a recruiter? We have hundreds of exciting job opportunities across North America with employers in need of hardworking professionals like you. Check out our job board today, and let’s work together to find your next career!

September 2020 Jobs Report

September 2020 Jobs Report: the U.S. Gains 661,000 Payrolls

The Labor Department reported that nonfarm payrolls rose by 661,000. That is the fewest gains since May and much lower than economists’ expectations of around 850,000 payrolls. Regardless of expectations, the unemployment rate continued to decline from 8.4% to 7.9%. Although slower than predicted, the U.S. economy is still on the path of recovery, even as COVID-19 cases continue to surge. Here is an overview of the September 2020 Jobs Report.

September Jobs Report overview

Despite all odds, employers around the nation are continuing to add jobs, although at a slower rate in the last three months. Hiring started to cool in July, with the growth of nearly 2 million positions. There are still roughly 10.7 million Americans out of work than before the pandemic hit in February. However, we have made huge strides over the last seven months when employment fell by more than 22 million, and the unemployment rate hit an all-time high of 14.7%. Fast forward to today, the unemployment rate is sitting at 7.9%, and has been consistently declining since April. Moreover, the number of unemployed Americans declined by 1.0 million to 12.6 million unemployed persons.

The labor force participation rate slightly declined by 0.3%, to 61.4%, which is 2% lower than it was back in February. Additionally, average hourly earnings bumped up 4.8%, to $29.47.

The impact of the coronavirus

As the country continues its battle with the coronavirus, the labor market outlook is a little precarious, despite consistent growth over the summer. Last month, the U.S. surpassed 200,000 deaths from the coronavirus pandemic, and this morning, it was confirmed President Trump tested positive for the virus. This is the final jobs report before the November election. Hopefully, our battle with the virus continues to trend in the right direction, and more employers can create jobs.

Job gains by industry

The industries with the largest employment growth are leisure and hospitality (+318,000), retail trade (+142,000), healthcare and social assistance (+108,000), professional and business services (+89,000), transportation and warehousing (+74,000), manufacturing (+66,000), financial activities (+37,000), information (+27,000), construction (+27,000), wholesale trade (+19,000), and mining (+1,000). Government payroll declined by 216,000 and private education fell by 69,000.

Revisions from the previous jobs report

Over the last two months, total nonfarm payroll employment gains were revised. In July, payrolls were revised up by 27,000, from +1,734,000 to +1,761,000, and in August, payrolls were revised up by 118,000, from +1,371,000 to 1,489,000. With revisions over the last two months combined, employment was 145,000 more than previously reported.

Are you ready to harvest more jobs this fall?

More employers are gaining confidence in the labor market and jumpstarting their hiring efforts. Plus, seasonal hiring is about to be kicked into high gear as employers will go on a hiring spree to keep up with seasonal demand this fall. If your team is ready to revive your hiring efforts, JSG is here to help. We have a solid grasp on the market and a strong pipeline of candidates that are ready to work. Reach out to us today, and let’s work together to fill your job vacancies.

Jobs with the Most Demand in September

Jobs with the Most Demand in September

As the economy and job market continue to recover, jobless claims are finally declining. Last week (ending September 11th), new jobless claims fell by 33,000 to 860,000. Employers have replaced nearly half of the 22 million jobs lost this spring due to the pandemic. However, some industries are rebounding faster than others, resulting in robust demand for numerous positions. Here are the jobs with the most demand in September.

Industries with the most growth

Retail, accounting, and cloud computing are three of the industries with the largest month-over-month growth. According to LinkedIn, retail positions make up five of the top ten fastest-growing jobs, from August to September. The demand for retail associates (+790%), service associates (+190%), sales advisors (+150%), retail specialists (+140%), and sales specialists (+140%) are all in high demand right now. Many stores and brands are on a hiring spree right now to accommodate the new waves of customers generated by the pandemic.

The demand for tax associates is up 600%, as many organizations are preparing for a messy and confusing post-COVID tax season. And cloud engineers are up 220% as companies expand their work from home capabilities.

The most in-demand jobs in September

Below are the jobs that are currently in high demand:

 

jobs with the most demand in September

As you can see, salespersons and software engineers are the jobs with the highest demand. These positions were already in strong demand, and the pandemic hasn’t changed that one bit, especially since these professionals can more readily work remotely. Also, RNs, cashiers, and other essential workers are still in high demand, and probably will continue to top the charts throughout 2020. Tax associates made a massive jump in August (up 69 spots) as companies and individuals prepare their taxes in this tough economy.

Do you need help securing a new opportunity?

If you are currently on the job market, it can be a little daunting. The market is competitive, and companies are now in the driver’s seat. We have gathered a fantastic group of resources for job seekers across the U.S. and Canada. Check out our blog for interview advice, job searching tips, and resume pointers. If you are ready to take the plunge into your next opportunity, we have hundreds of attractive jobs available. Review or job board today, and let’s work together.

August 2020 Jobs Report

August 2020 Jobs Report: 1.37 Million Jobs Added

For the fourth month in a row, the U.S. economy experienced a growth in jobs and a decline in the unemployment rate. In August, the Department of Labor reported job gains of 1.37 million with an unemployment rate of 8.4%. Although fewer payrolls than reported in previous months, August’s job gains are a strong indication that the country is making a steady recovery from the pandemic.

August 2020 Jobs Report Overview

The U.S. economy added more jobs than expected last month, a common occurrence throughout the last few months. Surveyed economists from the Dow Jones anticipated growth of only 1.32 million and an unemployment rate of 9.8%. In contrast, the Labor Department announced last week a slightly better than expected 1.37 million jobs and a jobless rate of 8.4% (from 10.2% last month). However, that’s a sharp decline from June’s 4.8 million jobs added and July’s 1.8 million.

Nonetheless, August was the lowest unemployment rate since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, which peaked at nearly 15%. The number of unemployed persons fell by 2.8 million to a total of 13.6 million. Although still notably high, the unemployment rate has been steadily decreasing for four consecutive months. Additionally, temporary layoffs declined by 3.1 million last month to a total of 6.2 million. That is a sharp reduction from April’s 18.1 million layoffs. As you can see, more Americans are finally returning to work as employers are able to bring back some of their staff.

Where are the jobs at?

The industries with the largest employment growth are government (+344,00), retail trade (+249,000), professional and business services (+197,000), leisure and hospitality (+174,000), education and health services (+147,000), transportation and warehousing (+78,000), financial activities (+36,000), manufacturing (+29,000), and wholesale trade (+14,000). Employment in mining, construction, and information changed little over the month.

Revisions from the previous jobs reports

Over the last two months, total nonfarm payroll employment gains were revised. In June, payroll employment declined by 10,000, from +4,791,000 to +4,781,000. In July, payroll gains were also revised down by 29,000, from +1,763,000 to +1,734,000. With revisions over the last two months combined, employment was 39,000 less than previously reported.

Are you ready to restart your hiring efforts?

As the healing process continues, more hiring managers and employers are gaining confidence in restarting their efforts. If you are actively searching for new talent or preparing to activate your hiring strategy, reach out to a recruiter from JSG. We are here to help you navigate this challenging labor market with ease. And if you are a job seeker, we are ready to help you find your next opportunity today. Let’s work together to find you your next role.

July 2020 Jobs Report

July 2020 Jobs Report: Three-Straight Months of Job Gains

For the third month in a row, the U.S. economy experienced a growth in jobs despite a spike in COVID-19 cases across many regions of the country. According to the Department of Labor, nonfarm payrolls increased by an additional 1.8 million jobs in July. That’s slightly better than the 1.5 million job gains predicted by economists. As a result of this uptick, the unemployment rate dropped to 10.2% from 11.1% the previous month. Although these numbers are inching closer to pre-pandemic growth, the labor market’s growth is decelerating from last month’s 4.8 million job gains in June.

July 2020 Jobs Report Overview

The addition of 1.8 million jobs is a steep decline from the shocking gain of 4.8 million jobs last month, the most significant single-month increase in U.S. history. However, despite surges in coronavirus cases, the U.S. economy is still adding jobs as many businesses slowly begin to open their doors. “The labor market continues to heal, which is encouraging, but there is a long road ahead,” said Michelle Meyer, head of U.S. economics at Bank of America.

Although improving at a slower rate, these numbers are surprising to many economists as unemployment claims are still trickling in. In the week ending on August 1, adjusted initial unemployment claims reached 1.18 million. As COVID-19 cases continue to soar, it will be interesting to see how this number fluctuates. Some states (such as Texas, Florida, Arizona, and California) may see this number increase, while others will decline as other states relax restrictions.

Additionally, the unemployment rate fell 0.9%, from 11.1% to 10.2%. This decline is a great indication that America is continuing to heal. However, the unemployment rate remains above the Great Recession high of 10% that was reached in October 2009. The labor force participation rate was 61.4%, virtually unchanged from the previous month. But on the brighter side, the average hourly earnings rose by $0.07 to $29.39, a nice surprise for many economists.

Where are the job gains?

Significant employment increases occurred in leisure and hospitality (+592,000), government (+301,000), retail trade (+258,000), professional and business services (+170,000), healthcare (+126,000), social assistance (+66,000), transportation and warehousing (+38,000), manufacturing (+26,000), financial activities (+21,000), and construction (+20,000). All other services industry added 149,000 jobs and mining again saw a decline of jobs (-7,000).

Revisions from previous months

Over the last two months, total nonfarm payroll employment gains were revised. In May, payroll employment increased by 26,000, from +2,699,000 to +2,725,000. In June, payroll gains were revised slightly down by 9,000, from +4,800,000 to +4,791,000. With revision over the last two months combined, employment was 17,000 higher than previously reported.

Get some hiring help in this volatile market

It’s evident from the July 2020 Jobs Report that the economy is still recovering. And as the market continues to heal, employers are starting to gain confidence in their hiring efforts. If you are ready to begin filling your vacant positions, reach out to a recruiter from JSG. We are ready to help you source the talent you need to get production levels back on track. Contact us today, and let’s work together to design a hiring strategy that works for you.

June 2020 Jobs Report

June 2020 Jobs Report: A Spark of Light in the Labor Market

Despite recent spikes in COVID-19 cases, the U.S. labor market exemplified signs of recovery in the June 2020 Jobs Report. Last month, non-farm payrolls added 4.8 million jobs in June, much higher than the +2.9 million expected by economists. As a result, the unemployment rate dropped to 11.1%, which is also better than the predicted rate of 12.4%. Overall, we still have a long way to go before we return to our pre-pandemic state, but we have seen a spark of light in the U.S. labor market for two consecutive months.

June 2020 Jobs Report Overview

The addition of 4.8 million jobs is a massive jump from May’s gain of 2.7 million jobs, marking the most significant single-month increase in U.S. history. “The 4.8 million rise in non-farm payrolls in June provides further confirmation that the initial economic rebound has been far faster than we and most others anticipated,” said Michael Pearce, senior U.S. economist at Capital Economics.

These numbers are a little surprising since jobless claims keep rolling in each week. In another report released by the Department of Labor, U.S. unemployment claims clocked in at 1.427 million. However, this contrast is partly because not every unemployed American is returning to work, even after states and counties continue to open. Thus, many of the 4.8 million jobs are new jobs that have been created over the last month.

The unemployment rate declined by 2.2%, from 13.3% in May to 11.1% last month. The labor force participation rate also saw a nice bump to 61.5%, another strong indication that we are well on our way to recovery. Additionally, the number of temporary layoffs in June fell by 4.8 million to a total of 10.6 million, following last month’s trend.

Where are the job gains at?

Significant employment increases occurred in leisure and hospitality (+2.1 million), retail trade (+740,000), education and health services (+568,000), manufacturing (+356,000), professional and business services (+306,000), construction (+158,000), transportation and warehousing (+99,000), wholesale trade (+68,000), financial activities (+32,000), and government (+33,000). Unfortunately, the mining industry continued to lose jobs (-10,000). Employment in all other services industries increased by +357,000.

Revisions from previous months

Over the last couple of months, non-farm payroll employment was revised. In April, employment was declined by 100,000 from -20.7 million to -20.8 million. However, May’s employment levels saw a positive change of +190,000 from +2.5 million to +2.7 million. With these revisions, employment in April and May combined was +90,000 higher than previously reported.

Employers are hiring again

The last two job reports illustrate that the country is beginning to recover. We are far from our pre-pandemic job gain levels and historic-low unemployment rates, but we are making progress. These numbers show the resiliency of our country and employers across the country. If you are currently on the job market, we have hundreds of opportunities with employers that need talent like you. Check out our job board and find the next step in your career today.