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3 Phrases to Never Say During a Job Interview

3 Phrases to Never Say During a Job Interview

When you finally land an opportunity to interview for a role that you are excited about, you probably have many emotions going through your mind. You are excited, relieved, anxious, and all of the above. However, how you present yourself primarily comes from your word choice or the phrases you use. Even small changes in your responses can have massive implications and leave your credibility in doubt with the hiring team. Here are three phrases to never say during a job interview to help you seal the deal.

“I don’t have much experience with this, but”

If there is a particular skill set that the hiring manager inquires about during your interview, never follow up with an answer like this, even if it’s true. Never lie about your qualifications during an interview (or any time during the hiring process). But, in your response, highlight the capabilities and experiences that you do have instead of focusing on the ones you don’t. If your answer emphasizes your limitations, you are making the hiring manager’s decision pretty easy. Basically, you must show how your experience makes you an asset or that you are ready for a new challenge. You can cross off everything on the hiring team’s list, but if you make them think you are unqualified for the position, you are doing yourself a disservice.

“My salary expectations are $X, but I am flexible.”

Never say this phrase during a job interview. If you are in a pre-screen meeting or a final interview, this question may arise. If a hiring professional asks you about your salary expectations, you must be prepared to answer this question. Do your due diligence beforehand to understand what you are worth. This range will be based on your field, location, years of experience, and qualifications. Once you have a number in mind, stick to it. Unless you really don’t care about your salary requirements, never say that you are flexible. Even if you are flexible with your pay, stating that you are flexible indicates to the hiring manager that you are willing to take less money. Instead of saying you are flexible with your salary, use your research to your advantage.

Here is an example: “for my next career move, I am looking for a salary between $65,000 and $70,000. This is based on comparisons from other professionals in this market with over five years of experience in this field and the unique skills I bring to the table.”

If you are looking for more advice on discussing salary expectations during an interview, check out this blog!

“I don’t have any questions.”

When you get to the end of almost any interview, the interviewer will likely ask if you have any questions. If your response is, “I don’t have any questions,” you are writing your own rejection letter. Having a few meaningful questions prepared is your opportunity to illustrate your interest in the position and make a lasting impression on the hiring team. Before your meeting, have a couple of questions at the ready. These questions can be about the role, the company, the team, or even about something one of the interviews mentioned earlier in the discussion.

If you want some help generating some questions to ask during your interview, here is some insight on what kind of questions you should be asking (and with some examples!).

So, these are three phrases to never say during a job interview. If you are looking for more interview advice, we have a plethora of tips and tricks on the JSG Blog!

Why You are Not Getting A Second Interview

Why You are Not Getting A Second Interview

You just knocked out the first round of interviews for a job that’s really piqued your interest. Overall, you feel that the meeting went well, and you are expecting an invitation for that second-round interview. But sadly, your phone never rings. From updating your resume to applying to the job, all that hard work can be an anxiety-filled process that drains a lot of your energy.

Many people, however, struggle with receiving a second interview, and it is a lot more common than you think. That is why we are here to help! Understanding why you are not getting a callback will help you become a better interviewer, and ultimately, achieve your career goals. Here are four possible reasons you are not getting a second interview and some suggestions to help you land that job!

Not a good fit for the job

When applying for a job, you may not check off every box the hiring manager is looking for in a candidate. This can also occur during an initial interview as you start to provide the hiring team more insight. You may have failed to cover all the areas they are looking for in an ideal candidate during your conversation. As a result, that second interview goes out the door.

Before you apply for a new job, always ask yourself if you are a good fit for this role. Carefully read through the job description and decide whether your skills and backgrounds match up. We are not saying you have to meet every point on the job description, but if there are significant holes and your transferrable skills don’t fill these gaps, you may want to pass on this opportunity. Thus, ignore jobs that don’t match your skill sets to save you a lot of heartbreak and improve your success rate in the future.

For more help with this step, check out our interview tips here! 

You didn’t send a thank-you note

Failing to send a thank-you note is a mistake many people make after an initial interview. After each interview, it’s essential to send a thank-you message to the hiring team to show your gratitude and reaffirm your interest in the role. Did you know that 68% of hiring managers and recruiters are influenced in their hiring decisions because of a thank-you note? This study shows a considerable advantage to those who send one after their initial interview. Thus, if you are not getting a second interview, it’s time to start sending thank-you notes!

Take a look at our guide for crafting the perfect post-interview thank-you note.

You interrupted too much

Sometimes, you may catch yourself talking more than actively listening to the hiring team when you get into the first interview. This tendency is most likely due to nerves, being anxious, and the desire to illustrate your excitement. To combat this, the acronym PIE (or passionate, interested, and engaged) can keep you on track in nailing the initial interview. Hiring managers tend to look for these three qualities in prospective employees. As you have conversations with hiring managers, keep this acronym in mind to ensure you are effectively communicating and leaving a strong impression.

You didn’t give them the right story 

It is vital to relate your skills, experience, and other qualifications back to the job in an interview. To do this effectively, you must carefully review the job description. Just like tailoring your resume to the job, you must tailor your answers to common interview questions to emphasize how you are a good fit for the position. By not telling hiring managers the “right story,” you aren’t communicating how you can add value to the team, which can steer you away from getting a callback.

Check out these tips on how to stand out in an interview to curate the best story possible! 

Are you looking for more interview advice?

Failing to progress through the interview process can be disheartening. However, if you follow these four tips, you will bolster your odds of receiving a second interview and securing your dream job! If you are looking for more interview advice, take a look at our Candidate Resources!

Why Hiring Managers Ask About Your Hobbies in Interviews

Why Hiring Managers Ask About Your Hobbies in Interviews

Sometimes the most innocent interview questions can catch us off guard. Hiring managers often ask, “what are your hobbies?” or “what do you like to do for fun outside of work?” You might be curious about the intention of these questions. Are they just trying to get to know you better? Or are they trying to read into your hobbies to see how you will fit with the company’s culture? Here are a few reasons why hiring managers ask about your hobbies in interviews.

It’s often an icebreaker question

Most of the time, asking about your hobbies is just an icebreaker question. In most situations, hiring managers will start with a few simple questions to get the interviewee talking and help them feel more relaxed during an otherwise tense setting. Asking about your hobbies is an easy way to help candidates open up and get them to speak more authentically throughout the interview. When the interviewee feels a little more relaxed, they are more likely to be themselves rather than put up a facade of what they think the hiring manager is looking for. So, if this question is brought up early on in your meeting, don’t read too much into it.

Shows what candidates are passionate about

Also, when hiring managers ask you about your hobbies in interviews, they may be trying to discover your passions. Sure, you can say your passions align with the company’s core values and mission statement. But do your hobbies back up these principles? Asking about your hobbies outside of work is an excellent way for hiring managers to get a better picture of the real you. It’s easy to put up a wall during an interview and show them what you think they want to hear. But a candidate divulging what they enjoy doing outside of work can provide better insight into what drives them and what they care about.

Hobbies can identify transferrable skills

When a hiring manager asks about your hobbies, they are sometimes trying to identify transferrable skills. Sure, you may have three years of experience in your field, but does your love of rock climbing or crocheting blankets have skills, such as leadership or attention to detail, that can translate to the job you are applying for? Basically, sharing your hobbies with hiring managers can help them understand how well-rounded you are as a person.

Additionally, these transferrable skills are even more significant for entry-level candidates with little to no real experience. If you are fresh out of school or made a career change during the pandemic, you may have little to no experience in this field or industry. However, understanding your hobbies and how you spend your free time can help the interviewers grasp what you can bring to the table, even if you don’t have direct experience.

When discussing your hobbies, be honest and provide examples

So, when you are asked this question in your interview, how do you tackle this question? First of all, have some appropriate hobbies at the top of your mind. Yes, we all like watching Netflix and hanging out with our friends. However, you must share hobbies that add value to your candidacy and reflect some of your skill sets. Think of hobbies that demonstrate drive, personal development, leadership qualities, and/or creativity. So whatever hobby you decide to share during your interview, be ready to provide examples and express why you enjoy that hobby. Explaining why you enjoy volunteering at your local food bank or cross-country skiing allows you to inject your personality during the hiring process and show off some of your soft skills that can be useful in this role.

Regardless of what hobby or activity you choose, do not lie about it. If you say you love playing chess and actually have no idea how to play, and you just want to look clever, you are in a world of trouble. Never lie about a hobby. The hiring manager may ask detailed questions about it, or coincidentally, share the same hobby. If you cannot intelligently discuss it, it won’t add value to your candidacy (and can hurt your chances if they suspect you are lying).

Are you looking for more job-search advice?

So, these are three reasons why hiring managers ask about hobbies during an interview. If you are looking for more job-search advice, take a look at our candidate resources! We have hundreds of helpful guides, articles, and tips to help you successfully land your next job.

Interview Tips to Help You Land Your Next Job

Interview Tips to Help You Land Your Next Job

Interviews are an essential step to a potential job opportunity to show off who you are and showcase how you will make a positive impact. As you start to land more interviews, nerves can be a familiar feeling headed into an interview when thinking about why you would make a great fit. This feeling is normal and can sometimes bring a lot of stress to someone. That is why we will breaking down some essential tips to help you land your next job. 

Confidence is Key 

It is no secret that any potential employer will want to see some confidence in any candidate they interview. That is why practicing the way you talk throughout your interview is imperative. If you can portray that you are confident in your work and yourself, it will impress any hiring manager. Having confidence in your ability to talk is not the only thing, but also how you prepare for the interview itself. By researching the company or business you are interviewing for, you will feel more confident about why you want the position and how you will fit into that specific role. This research can help you connect your experience from your resume to the job you are applying for, giving the hiring manager a better sense of how you make a positive impact.

Connecting these dots is a great way to follow up with specific interview questions, showing them that you are excited about this opportunity. Overall, having confidence coming into an interview will naturally give off a great impression to any hiring manager and help you land your next job.

Knocking Down the Interview Questions 

During your interview, you are going to be asked a ton of questions. Some questions will be easier than others, but clearly answering all the questions is essential to land your next job. The main idea of answering any interview question is showing value and demonstrating and providing examples. You mustn’t ramble past the original question and keep your responses to a reasonable length. Hiring managers can lose focus if you start to wander on one question and lose track of what you are saying. It is essential to keep your responses to questions focused on the topic and relating it back to your prospective new job.

If you want to knock down your interview questions and land your next job, practice your answers to some of the most common (and tricky) interview questions.

Show Off Who You Are 

The whole point of an interview is to show off your personality and who you are. Hiring managers want to get a sense of who you are, so it is crucial to take advantage of small talk and storytelling. In going into and out of your interview, you will find some time to talk to the hiring manager about random things that pop up. For example, talking about the weather outside and what activities you like to do outside of work. This chit-chat can be an excellent opportunity to illustrate some of your personality and help you establish rapport with the hiring team. When storytelling, you have a chance to create a narrative of your career and what you want to do in the future. Again, this is an excellent opportunity to give the interviewers a sneak peek into your personality and help you land your next job.

Follow Up 

Finally, after any interview you have, it is crucial to thank the hiring team for their time. Always make sure to send a thank-you email and reiterate your gratitude for the interview. In your email, you should briefly summarize why you are a perfect fit for the team and what you can bring to the table. Are you interested in more interviewing tips or tricks? Check out our interview prep and advice resources to help you land your next job! 

How to Recover from An Interview Disaster

How to Recover from An Interview Disaster

A job interview is a stressful experience, and it can be easy to get rattled. Most of us have unfortunately had an interviewing blunder – after all, it’s part of the process. Whether it was a missed opportunity to share one of your skill sets, a question you weren’t prepared to answer, or something completely slipped your mind; it happens to the best of us. So, can you redeem yourself post-interview to save your chances of landing a new opportunity? Here is how you recover from an interview disaster to approach this predicament with grace.

Stay calm

If you catch yourself in the middle of an interview disaster, the first step is to stay calm. Panicking or overreacting will only make the situation worse. Everybody makes mistakes and what matters is how you recover from them. If you make a mistake in an interview, take a moment to compose yourself before you act. If you get worked up or rush to try to redeem yourself, you may dig yourself a deeper hole.

Buy yourself a few moments

If you get yourself in a pickle during your interview, you can do some damage control during your meeting. For example, if an interview question stumps you, you can buy yourself some time instead of panicking, trying to formulate a lackluster answer. To do this, ask your interviewer to repeat the question, ask a clarification question, or even request a moment to think. So, if an interviewer asks you a tricky question, you can stall a bit by saying something like, “That’s a really great question. I have actually never been asked that before.” Even a quick couple of sentences like that can buy you enough time to formulate a response without providing a filibuster answer.

If you make a mistake, redeem yourself immediately

If you do make a mistake, redeem yourself immediately. Whether it’s a question you can’t answer, or you forget to tie in a skill set or project while answering a question, remedy the interview disaster ASAP. For example, we recently interviewed an intern here at JSG. We asked about a certificate listed on their resume, and they couldn’t tell us anything they learned from the course. They sent a follow-up email three days later apologizing again and providing some details on the certification, but it was too little, too late.

They did the right thing by emailing the team and providing some insight on this certification, but they should have done it the same day. In that three-day span, we interviewed several excellent candidates, and unfortunately, this interviewee didn’t make the cut. Therefore, if you find yourself in this situation, the right move is to send an email and clarify a response or provide more information. However, you must do so as soon as humanly possible to recover from an interview disaster.

Learn from your interview disaster

The best way to recover from an interview disaster is to learn from it. It is unfortunate, and depending on the mistake, it can cost you your chances of landing the job. However, as long as you learn from your mishap, it isn’t a complete failure. You will be ready mentally and physically if this situation arrives again and be able to recover from it in the future. The great John Wooden summed this up perfectly when he said, “Failure isn’t fatal, but failure to change might be.”

If you are looking for more interviewing advice, review our candidate resources! We have dozens of helpful tips and advice to help you nail the interview and receive that much-deserved job offer.

Five Video Interview Mistakes to Avoid this Year

Five Video Interview Mistakes to Avoid this Year

As employers begin their return to the office or working onsite, virtual interviewing is here to stay. Even when the virus is in the rearview mirror, most employers will rely on video interviews to streamline the hiring process, cut hiring costs, and expand their talent pools. With this newly adopted interviewing format, here are five video interview mistakes to avoid this year.

Joining the video interview late

Like a traditional face-to-face interview, the last thing you want to do is arrive late. Being tardy for your meeting is one of the biggest video interview mistakes you can make. If you are interviewing at home, you have no excuses to be punctual. You don’t have to drive or take public transportation to the meeting, find the right office, and arrive on time. Launch the video interview application a few minutes before your meeting to ensure you are on time. Starting your interview a few minutes late will create some unnecessary stress and derail your entire interview.

Not familiarizing yourself with the technology

Familiarizing yourself with the technology is as important as logging into the video application early. Logging on early does you no good if you have no idea how to navigate the technology. You don’t want to be fumbling around on your computer trying to fix your audio, turn on your camera, or remove a silly video filter. Many mainstream video technologies like Zoom or Microsoft Teams are similar; however, if you never used the application before, it’s wise to familiarize yourself with it before your interview.

Surrounding yourself with distractions

Another video interview mistake to avoid is not eliminating distractions. You must eliminate things that will distract you from performing your best and remove anything that may distract your interviewers. That means interviewing in a quiet, well-lit room with a clean background. Keep your kids and pets distracted for the meeting with their favorite show or a new treat, and clean the space around you. Practicing with the technology beforehand will help you identify anything you need to remove from your interviewing area that might cause an unwanted distraction.

Showcasing poor communication skills

If you want your interview to result in a job offer, you must showcase excellent communication skills (especially if this is for a remote opportunity). Sometimes, it can be challenging to facilitate a conversation over a video call. The key to ensuring strong communication skills is listening. Instead of jumping at every chance to speak, listen to your interviewer. Listen intently to understand their questions, wait a few seconds after they finish talking to avoid any interruptions, and ask follow-up questions. It is essential to be engaging, ask thoughtful questions, and answer their questions in detail.

Not sending a thank-you email

Finally, one of the most common video interview mistakes is failing to send a thank you email afterward. Just like a traditional interview, you must always send a thank you note. Bonus points if you can send one to everyone on the video call. Since you are at home, you have the luxury of quickly jotting down the names of each interviewer to send them a personalized thank you message.

Here is a guide on how to craft the perfect virtual interview thank-you note.

Interview Questions For Every Stage Of The Interview Process

Interview Questions For Every Stage Of The Interview Process

If you’ve spent any time on our blog at all, you know you need to ask questions during your interviews. However, it can be challenging to determine which questions to ask at which stage. Modern interviews feature anywhere from one to eight different interviews for one job. And the questions you ask during the initial phone screen should be different from the questions you ask at a final interview. Today, we’re breaking down the differences and laying out interview questions for every stage of the process.

Initial Phone Screen Interview Questions

The initial phone screen might not even be with the actual hiring manager, so it’s not the time to get into the nitty-gritty details. However, it is an excellent opportunity to get any further clarification on the position, company, or work environment. Here are a few examples of great interview questions to ask during your initial phone screen.

  • Can you provide some more information about this aspect of the job?
  • Is this position in office, remote, or hybrid?
  • Would you like a list of references?
  • What is the next step in the interview process?
  • When can I expect to hear about the next step?
  • Is there anything else I can share about my experience or qualifications?

Face-to-Face Interview Questions

When you have a face-to-face interview, things are getting a bit more serious. You’re most likely meeting with the hiring manager or maybe even additional team members at this stage. Whether it’s in-person or over video chat, it’s the perfect opportunity to delve deeper into the job’s duties and the team’s culture. Here are a couple of great questions to ask during a face-to-face interview.

  • How can I make an immediate impact in this position?
  • Who will I be working with most closely?
  • Are there opportunities for professional development?
  • What is the company or team’s management style?
  • What is most challenging about this job?
  • What is your favorite part about working here?

Final Interview Questions

If you’ve made it this far, congratulations! You are in strong consideration for the role, so this is the perfect time to really wow the interviewer with some great questions. At this point, you can really get into the details of what it would look like for you to be in this role and how you personally would fit in with the team. Here are a few bold questions you can ask during a final interview to leave a lasting impression.

  • What are the performance metrics for this role?
  • How will expectations and feedback be communicated for this position?
  • How do I compare to other candidates interviewing for this job?
  • What would you say are the most important skills for a successful person in this position to have?
  • How does this position contribute to the larger goals of the organization?
  • How would you describe your department’s culture?
  • If I were to be hired for this position, when would you like me to start?

These are just a handful of questions you can ask at each stage of the interview process. Keep in mind that it’s best to also incorporate questions that arise during your interviews, and don’t be afraid to circle back to something you need more information on. And if you’re interested in more interview advice, check out our interview prep and advice resources to increase your interview knowledge and boost your confidence.

How to Prepare for A Phone Interview in 2021

How to Prepare for A Phone Interview in 2021

Congratulations! Your hard work is paying off, and you are finally getting some traction with your job search. You have a phone interview scheduled, and you are starting to get a little anxious. Don’t fret – with a bit of preparation and practice, you can enter your conversation feeling confident. If you are looking for a refresher course on how to prepare for a phone interview, here are five simple tips to make an excellent impression on the hiring manager.

Set up a professional voicemail

When was the last time you reviewed your voicemail? We typically don’t call ourselves, so your voicemail might be out of date or a little too casual. Take a few minutes to listen to your voicemail and update it if necessary. Make sure it’s professional yet friendly and that there is no background noise. You never know when you for some reason might miss an interview call or play phone tag with each other. 

Check your battery and cell reception

Since you will probably be using your cell phone during your phone interview, make sure the battery is fully charged. The last thing you want to happen is your phone to die halfway through your conversation. Have the battery charged up and silent your phone to not receive any distracting notifications buzzing in your ear. Also, ensure your phone reception is strong, so the call quality is impeccable. Your voice must come out crystal clear, and for you, you must have strong enough service to be able to hear your interviewer without any hiccups.

Have important documents at the ready

Since you can have this phone interview in your home, you can access important application documents. You can pull up your resume, cover letter, job description, the company website, and other essential documents. If you do this on your computer, close all your other windows and mute your computer so you can silently switch between them. If you want to print them out, have them organized so you aren’t struggling to shuffle through them on the phone. Having these documents at the ready can help you brilliantly answer any questions that might otherwise catch you off guard.

Take notes

During your phone interview, you should be taking notes. Jot down important things the hiring manager says or something you want to discuss further in your interview. In an interview, time flies by, and you can easily forget an excellent question as quickly as you can formulate it. Have a notepad and pen within arm’s reach to write down notes, questions, or anything else you might find valuable throughout the interviewing process.

Show enthusiasm in your voice

A crucial part of a traditional face-to-face interview is body language – nodding your head, smiling, and other non-verbal cues that illustrate your excitement and personality. In a phone interview, you don’t have this opportunity, so you must demonstrate your enthusiasm in your voice. To make sure there is excitement in your voice, don’t forget to smile! It’s true what they say; you can hear someone smiling in their voice. Also, remember it is okay to laugh if there is a funny moment in your interview.

Are you looking for more interview advice?

With social distancing and more people working from home, you can almost bet one of your interviews will be conducted through the phone. These are just a few easy ways you can prepare for a phone interview in 2021. If you are looking for more interview advice, check out our interview insight page for dozens of helpful tips, tricks, and suggestions to nail your interview!

5 COVID Questions To Ask At Your Next Interview

5 COVID Questions To Ask At Your Next Interview

It’s important that you show up to any interview with a few great questions at the ready. However, in today’s day and age, those questions may look a little bit different. There’s no doubt that the Coronavirus pandemic is on everybody’s mind. And that doesn’t change just because you’re looking for a new job! If COVID-19 policies and procedures are a priority for you (and they should be), it is perfectly acceptable to ask COVID-related questions during your interview. As always, read the room to gauge which questions would be most appropriate. Here are five possible COVID questions you can ask at your next interview.

How has COVID-19 impacted your company?

No matter what industry they are in, their company’s size, or the role you’re interviewing for, the company has most certainly been impacted by COVID-19. Work may have slowed or stopped altogether, they may have shifted to remote work, or the company may have even implemented layoffs and furloughs. What you’re looking for in the interviewer’s answer here is transparency. You should not expect them to have handled it perfectly; that is unrealistic. However, if they are transparent about the struggles they experienced, that’s a good sign that they’ll be transparent with employees!

Will I be expected to come into the office, or are you offering remote work?

Hopefully, this was covered earlier in the interview. However, if it wasn’t, it’s essential to address it! Additionally, you can gain further clarification into their remote work policies. Is it temporary? How much flexibility do they offer? Are employees expected to secure additional childcare when working from home?

What are your COVID-19 procedures?

This is a great lead-in question to discuss COVID-19 safety measures. If the company requires employees to work in-office, are they following social distancing guidelines, providing hand sanitizer, and adhering to mask requirements? Additionally, you’ll want to understand their procedures if an employee is diagnosed with COVID-19. Do they require all employees to quarantine? Is it possible to complete your work while quarantined? The interviewer’s answers to this challenging question will give you a glimpse into how much they prioritize their staff’s health.

How has COVID-19 affected your vacation and sick leave policies?

Prior to the pandemic, it was utterly taboo to ask about paid time off during the interview. However, things have changed in the past year! COVID-19 has forced many companies to rethink their traditional vacation and sick leave policies. With a minimum self-isolation period of 10 days after exposure, you could burn through traditional PTO very quickly if they haven’t made accommodations. Just be sure to frame the question as above rather than the greedy “how many vacation days would I get?”

What have you done to support employees working from home?

Lastly, if the company is allowing employees to work from home, please ask more about it! Starting a new job isn’t easy, and it’s intimidating if you’re in a traditional office setting, not to mention working from home during a global pandemic without having met anyone in person! You will want to hear that they have established a remote onboarding program, prioritize employee development, and make significant efforts to decrease isolation through various communication software.

As we mentioned above, it’s impossible to expect picture-perfect answers to these challenging COVID questions. Instead, look for transparency, organization, and active actions. And remember, it’s okay for you to prioritize your health and safety during an interview! If you want to feel extra prepared for your Coronavirus-era interview, explore our candidate resources for more tips and tricks!

5 Signs You Nailed Your Interview

5 Signs You Nailed Your Interview

Usually, it is pretty easy to know when an interview is going well, and when it’s going not so well. As a human being with emotional intelligence, you can typically understand how well you are doing in an interview based on verbal and non-verbal cues. However, there are a few signals that indicate your interview is going extraordinarily well, like receiving a job offer well. Here are five signs you nailed your interview.

Body language is indicating excitement

Positive body language is one of the easiest signs indicating you nailed your interview. When your interviewer has a big smile on their face, nodding their head in agreement, and genuinely looks interested in what you are saying, those are all strong signs the interview is going well. It’s easy to tell when a hiring manager isn’t engaged or looks bored. Positive body language is a sure sign that they like what you are saying and that your meeting is going well.

The conversation turns more causal

When your conversation turns more casual, that is a strong indication you are nailing your interview. If your conversation transitions from a formal business meeting to more of a back-and-forth conversation, they like what they hear! It might be some small talk or bouncing ideas off of each other. Either way, when the interview transitions from question and answer to conversational, you’re doing great!

The interviewer keeps bringing people in

If your interviewer says something on the lines of, “Let me grab [co-worker name] or “I want you to meet [co-worker name], you should be feeling confident! Your interviewer would not waste their co-workers’ time by bringing them into your interview if they weren’t excited about you. If they show you around and actively introduce you to others or have other people join mid-way through your meeting, you are rocking it! If this is happening, your interviewer wants other decision-makers to weigh in on your candidacy.

You start hearing “when” instead of “if”

When your interviewer is using words like “when,” “us,” or “our,” it’s going well. For example, if they say, “when you receive your background check” or “this is where our team often meets,” that is a strong sign they are already picturing you in the position. If they believe you are a good fit for the job, they may start unintentionally use language that illustrates it’s only a matter of time until you are part of the team.

They give you clues on the next steps

Towards the end of your interview, if the hiring manager starts cluing you in on the next steps, that shows you are nailing it. If they start talking about onboarding, the second round of interviews, or a timeline for a hiring decision, it shows they have an interest in you. Your interviewer would not bother sharing those details unless you were at the top of their list. So, if your interviewer starts voluntarily sharing the next steps, that is an excellent sign you’re nailing your interview.

Need more interview advice?

These are five signs that you nailed your interview. Obviously, none of these signs guarantee you a job offer, but they are generally good hints that you did well. If you are looking for more interview advice, check out our candidate resources on the JSG blog!