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social media

Should Employers Screen Candidate’s Social Media?

According to a 2017 study by Careerbuilder, nearly 70% of employers screen their candidates’ social media activity. And given the steady growth of social media since then, it’s safe to assume that number only continues to grow. However, in a world of online information, a lot of questions begin to arise surrounding this controversial topic. Is it even legal to screen based on a candidate’s social media? If so, is it ethical? And even further, is it causing you to miss out on qualified talent? We’re breaking these questions down to give you an in-depth look into the role that social media plays in today’s recruiting practices. 

Is it legal?

So, technically viewing any public social media is legal. You can’t fault anybody for that! However, it gets tricky when it starts affecting your hiring decisions. Employers must abide by laws prohibiting discrimination when it comes to employment practices. Even a quick glance at a candidate’s social media exposes you to the risk of making judgments based on protected classes. These include but are not limited to color, race, sex, religion, or national origin. You may even fall victim to your own unconscious bias, walking a thin line of legality. 

Is it ethical?

Many employers are of the mindset that if something is public online, it is part of your personal brand. Thus, if they hire you, your brand becomes an extension of the company’s brand. While this may be true, it’s important to tread carefully with judgments based solely on social media presence. There have been a few controversial cases over the last few years where candidates were not hired because of something seen on social media.

Remember the viral story from 2019 about a girl who was not only turned down for a job but publicly shamed on a company’s social media for posting a bikini-clad photo on her personal account? While this action was technically not illegal, it certainly was not ethical. In fact, it caused the entire company to implode – completely deleting its website and social media accounts altogether.

Is it limiting your talent pool?

Legal and ethical ramifications aside, judging candidates based on their social media presence alone could be causing you to miss out on incredible employees. In order to grow, companies must diversify their talent pool based on experiences, personalities, and skillsets. By reserving judgment until a candidate has completed a full hiring process, you have a greater chance of hiring a more diverse team.

Therefore, it’s not in an employer’s best interest to screen a candidate’s social media during the hiring process. However, if a clean online presence is important to your company or a specific position, it is perfectly okay to set rules and boundaries regarding personal social accounts for onboarded employees. (And P.S., if you’re a candidate, it’s a good idea to clean up your social accounts anyway – just in case!)

Interested in reading more insider takes on employment and hiring? Check out the JSG blog!

3 Steps To Secure The Future Of Work

3 Steps You Can Take To Secure The Future Of Work

With the advancement of technology, the future of work is changing. But is the workforce evolving with it? A recent study presented at the World Economic Forum suggests that it is not. A survey of 15-year-olds from 41 different countries indicates that they have a narrow view of potential careers to grow into. In fact, the report revealed that 39% of jobs that today’s teenagers dream of run the risk of being replaced by machines within the next 10 to 15 years. These jobs include doctors, lawyers, managers, and teachers. So, how can we combat this and save the future of work? If you are a tech-forward company or industry, here are three steps you can take today to ensure that you have a healthy staff in 15 years.

1. Host Job Shadowing Events For Local High Schools

One of the main reasons that teenagers aren’t thinking past traditional job roles is that they don’t know what else is out there! Help uncover the many options available to them by hosting job shadow events at your office. Invite kids to come, hear about the work you do, the types of jobs available, and let them see you in action. As a bonus, if you make a great impression, your company may be added to shortlists of where teens would like to work!

2. Offer Paid Internships To College Students

During their time in college, many students are on the hunt for paid internships. Offer them throughout your various departments, and most importantly, don’t require any experience! Allow students to train on the job, and learn about how to do different roles at your company. As the talent pool for young workers heats up, compensation gets more and more competitive. Be sure to offer compensation that shows your investment in the future of work.

3. Educate Through Social Media

It’s no secret that the younger generations love social media. It’s how they connect with friends, keep up to date on news, and even self-educate. Use your company’s social channels as a platform for educating teenagers about your company and the variety of roles you offer. Post behind the scenes shots of your team and do a deep dive into the technology of what you do.

Want to have a further conversation about how your company can attract talent of all levels? Contact one of our experienced team members today!

How To Hire Remote Employees

How To Hire Remote Employees

Did you know that 50% of employees worldwide work outside of their main office for at least 2.5 days a week? And companies are reaping the benefits. 85% of business leaders have expressed that flexible working has made their business more productive, and 67% even think that flexibility can improve productivity by at least a fifth. If your team has yet to add remote workers, now is a great time to do it!

Expand your search

Hiring remote employees allows you to expand your net for finding talent significantly. Consider this when posting your job listing, and don’t limit it to only specific areas. Some of the most talented candidates may live in remote areas or even overseas. This is where partnering with a recruiting firm can come in handy, as we have connections with candidates worldwide.

Look for key skills

Any successful remote employee needs to excel at a few key skills. These include great communication, exceptional organization, and reliable accountability. To assess a candidate’s mastery in these three areas, be sure to ask lots of behavioral questions during the interview process. Additionally, remote employees MUST be tech-savvy. Without an in-person support team to troubleshoot, they will need to be comfortable with all sorts of different technology ranging from reporting software to video conferencing.

Be upfront about expectations

The stipulations around every single remote position are different. Throughout the hiring process, starting with the job listing, be clear about what you expect from remote employees. Explain how they will be evaluated, and how their position measures success. It’s essential that you follow through on these expectations throughout the hiring process, and as soon as your new employee is on board.

Consider hiring contract

If you’re still a little wary about hiring remote employees, consider starting with a contractor. You can always offer a contractor a permanent position down the road (contract-to-hire); often referred to as the “try before you buy” method.

Flexible working is the future. If your company is curious about how you can hire more remote employees, or simply need help discovering the talent you need; talk to one of our experienced recruiters today.

How To Avoid False-Positive Hiring Decisions

How To Avoid False-Positive Hiring Decisions

There is an art to interviewing, and just because someone has mastered that aspect it doesn’t necessarily mean they are the right person to hire, which is why we want to discuss false-positive hiring. This is when you hire someone who excels during the interview but underperforms on the job once hired. How can you avoid making this fateful mistake? Follow these 3 steps to ensure that you aren’t hiring candidates just because they’re an expert interviewer.

Dig deeper

Many interviews feature the same questions. “Why do you want to work here?” “What are your strengths and weaknesses?” “Why should we hire you?” And while these questions can be an effective initial gauge, it’s crucial to push candidates a little further in order to understand their true personalities and motivations. Always ask candidates to elaborate on their answers and ask further questions based on their responses.

Seek diversity

When sifting through resumes and conducting interviews, be sure to assess a variety of candidates. Seek diversity in gender, age, ethnicity, experience, and more. It’s been proven that teams with more diversity consistently perform better and are overall more successful. Additionally, this will allow you to avoid confirmation bias, wherein you hire someone whom you think would be suitable for the job without actually assessing their skills

Set clear expectations about the job (and follow-through)

When candidates have an idyllic concept of the job they’re interviewing for in their mind, they may just say anything necessary to get the job. To truly understand if someone will be a good fit, explain all aspects of the job, good and bad. Ask behavioral questions centered around the challenges of the position to avoid false-positive hiring. Pry the candidate on how they work on teams, individually, and how they like to be managed. Discuss 30, 60, and 90-day goals and how employees are evaluated at each stage. Be sure to follow through on those evaluations, and don’t be afraid to set high expectations!

Looking for more tips on how to improve your hiring process? Connect with one of our experienced team members today!

Work Flexibility, Remote Work, Hiring

How Work Flexibility Can Transform Your Hiring Process

Today’s competitive hiring environment has left many managers scratching their heads. You may find yourself asking, “how can we hire candidates with the necessary skills and experience to help achieve our growth goals?” Well, it’s not as simple of an answer as it used to be. When considering new opportunities, candidates are now weighing a multitude of factors — one of the main ones being work flexibility.

According to LinkedIn’s latest report of Global Talent Trends, work flexibility is quickly rising to the top of candidate requirements. And your competitors are getting on board! In fact, there has been a 78 percent increase in job posts on LinkedIn that mention work flexibility since 2016. Here are a few of the facts behind work flexibility and how it can completely transform your hiring process.

Attracts Candidates

51 percent of talent professionals state that work flexibility is one of the top features attracting candidates in today’s market. According to Anna Auerbach, Co-Founder and Co-CEO of Werk, “candidates are asking about flexibility in the interview process, and that was not happening a few years ago. If your answer is, ‘let me check with HR,’ you’ve already lost the candidate.” Be sure to mention your flexible work policies in job descriptions and throughout the interview process. That way, you can simultaneously attract candidates while setting expectations early and often.

Increased Diversity

We know how important diversity hiring is to our clients. Have you ever considered that work flexibility could be the solution you’re looking for? According to LinkedIn, women are 22 percent more likely than men to rank flexible work arrangements as a very important factor when considering a job. Sara Sutton, founder of the organization 1 Million for Work Flexibility, expands, explaining that it’s not just about working moms. “It’s people with disabilities, military spouses, people with health problems, caretakers, and people living in rural or economically disadvantaged areas. People need and want work flexibility for a lot of different reasons.”

Employee Retention

When you reward your employees with trust, they are much more likely to stick around. In fact, 54 percent of talent professionals cite encouraging retention as a major perk of flexible work. This can significantly assist in your recruiting efforts. When your current employees are happy, that shines through to prospective candidates! Not to mention, you’ll have less turnover, and thus, fewer spots to fill.

Keep in mind, work flexibility isn’t just about allowing employees to work remotely. A flexible work environment encompasses full-time remote employees, occasional remote working situations, the ability to shift working hours, and the freedom to briefly step away when needed. Try implementing one of these flexible solutions and watch how your hiring process transforms along with your working environment!

How to Hire Smarter in 2017, Johnson Service Group, Johnson Search Group, jobs, hire, hire smarter, smart, JSG, linkedin, hiring budget, retention, client resources

How to Hire Smarter in 2017

As we navigate through the early stages of 2017, the hiring landscape is full of excitement, promise, and the unknown. We have been in an increasingly stable economy for a few years now, the candidate-driven market is in full swing, and authenticity is becoming a priority for employers and candidates alike. One thing is for certain, 2017 will be a competitive hiring year with candidates obtaining more soft skills, companies offering more enticing perks, and millions of open jobs. In order to compete, you’re going to have to hire smarter in 2017. Here are the most important trends to keep in mind:

How to Hire Smarter in 2017

  1. Average time to hire

Time to hire has always been an important metric in recruiting, but it is now more essential than ever. Did you know that 30% of companies currently hire in less than 1 month? Chances are, those companies are landing the top talent you need to successfully grow your team. Over 50% of companies say it takes 1-2 months and 17% say it can be up to 3-4 months. In a growing candidate-driven market, the urgency of that 30% will win out when it comes to hiring the best employees. In 2017, you’ll need to ask yourself, what can my team do to get to that 30% range?

How to Hire Smarter in 2017

  1. Quality of hire

As the labor market opens up, candidates are more fluid and it’s getting more and more difficult to not only find the best talent, but to retain them as well. In 2017, companies will be focusing on measuring the success of their hiring. The number one contributing factor? The length of time new hires stay at a company. What many leaders forget, however, is that retention starts at the time of hire. Are you hiring the best candidates on the market? Are you accurately and transparently representing the culture and community of your company? Are you hiring for personality as well as hard skills?

How to Hire Smarter in 2017

  1. What you can offer a candidate

Gone are the days when candidates were in it “just for the money.” When considering an employer, candidates consider culture and values first and foremost, even before perks and benefits. Mission and vision also play an important part in the decision process. And when asked what swayed them to take a job? 44% said opportunities for career advancement and challenging work. We’re willing to bet that your company has a great culture, comparable benefits, and challenging work, but the question remains, are you conveying this information to potential candidates during the hiring process?

How to Hire Smarter in 2017

  1. Hiring budget

According to LinkedIn, 37% of companies plan to increase their recruiting budgets this year. When asked what they would invest in if they had an unlimited budget, companies prioritized employer branding, new technology, better sourcing tools, candidate experience, and training for recruiters. But what if there was one solution that could do all of these things for a fraction of the cost?

You’d be surprised at the power of partnering with a third party recruiter. At JSG, we can do all of these things and more (it’s kind of our thing). Give us a call today to discuss your hiring needs for 2017 and how we might be able to help. We can’t wait to connect you with the talent you need to make this year, your year.

*All data and information from LinkedIn’s Global Recruiting Trends 2017 Report. Click here to download.

The Fine Art Of Stalking In Recruiting

The Fine Art of Stalking in Recruiting

The Fine Art of Stalking in Recruiting

All great sales people and recruiters do it. “Stalking” is probably too strong a word, but we do check you out. It is vital informational gathering part of a recruiting career. Gathering information prior to contacting a potential client, candidate or before applying to a job is simply invaluable and smart. It takes the cold out of cold calling. LinkedIn, LinkedIn Recruiter, Google, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.  About 48-91% of employers perform a digital search, through these platforms, about a potential new hire. There are fountains of information out there.

It’s Not That Weird

We don’t do it to be creepy or crazy, but as people who want to know you a little better than what your resume says so that we can glean your drivers, motivators and what kind of human being you are. Then, we can get a better feel for you and determine if what we have to sell is what you might want to buy. And vice versa. Recruiting requires a candidate to fit the position. It’s hard to guess the fit otherwise, and with today’s tools, we don’t have to.

We were the kids who would have shared a bond over a dead worm, took that other kid’s hand or punched them on the arm in a cheerful fever and said, “Wanna be friends?” We live to connect. And what better way than to look you up?

But it’s what we do with the information that we collect that enables us to help you grow in either your career, or in your business. The best practices in recruiting are built on optimizing connections and information.

“Stalking” in the Corporate World

Leading the Corporate Recruiting function for a major staffing firm, I look at every single resume that I receive. People try to get past the screeners (it doesn’t work), try out generic messages and cover letters (it doesn’t work), and downright lie (it doesn’t work because we have probably the most cohesive and connected team as a company that I’ve ever worked with and we talk openly with each other often). We’re cautious and careful hirers. And we do our, “homework.”

There are many ways in which to stalk gather information. And you should be doing it, too. Not creepily or crazily! In ways that help you determine if what you have to sell is what someone wants to buy and vice versa.