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How Due Diligence Will Land You The Job

How Due Diligence Will Land You The Job

How Due Diligence Will Land You The Job

Congratulations! You’ve submitted a great resume, personalized it to the specific job to which you’re applying and the recruiter called you to schedule a phone interview for a corporate job opening.

Enter me, or someone like me, the recruiter.

I’ve looked at every resume that was submitted to the job posting. I proactively sourced passive candidates, too, from at least five other places. Only 3% actually met the hard requirements. And 1.5% weren’t scattered with misspellings, bad grammar and weird hobby information and relationship statuses.

You and I schedule the call. On average, for that position, my goal is to submit 2-3 people per week, knowing that to meet that goal, I need to find 5-7 candidates who qualify on paper.

My interviews are conversational. I really want to get to know you as a person to determine if you’ll fit into our culture. I also really want you to succeed and get the job.

When we talk, I set up the call for you so you know what to expect. I like to start with your latest position, understand what the company does, what your role is, why you’re looking to leave and get compensation information. After obtaining information about your last five years of employment, I present you with our company history, culture, direction, values and a few details about the role.

Before I present that to you, though, I ask you something. Here are the typical scenarios:

Scenario #1

“So, have you had a chance to look at our website?’
You: “Yes.”
Me: “What’s your understanding of who we are and what we do?”
You provide a good and detailed explanation of what you read about and how you would contribute.
In my notes, I write, “Did really good due diligence, etc.,” and happily submit you to the hiring manager.

Scenario #2

“So, have you had a chance to look at our website?’
You: “Yes.”
Me: “What’s your understanding of who we are and what we do?”
You: “What?”
Me: “What’s your understanding of who we are and what we do?”
You: “Um.” You try to wing it.
What I think: “Get outta here.”
What I say: “Ok. We had a good conversation and I’m going to submit you, but here’s our website.”
(If we had a great conversation, I’m forgiving.)
What I write in my notes: “Did not do due diligence. Tried to wing it. Good conversation before that, though.”

You’d get submitted, but compare yourself now to Scenario #1 and put yourself in the hiring manager’s shoes. Who would be your candidate of choice?

Scenario #3

“So, have you had a chance to look at our website?’
You: “Yes.”
Me: “What’s your understanding of who we are and what we do?”
You: “You know, I’m sorry, but I wasn’t sure of your website.”
What I think: “You really should have asked for it when we scheduled the phone screen, or have been able to figure it out by my email address and put on your calendar to do some research.”
What I say: “Ok. We had a good conversation and I’m going to submit you, but here’s our website.” What I write: “Did not do due diligence, but was honest about it.”

Better than Scenario #2, but still not as good as Scenario #1.

Hiring managers are looking for oomph, honesty, and integrity. And pssst…they LOVE it when you do your due diligence.

The Fine Art Of Stalking In Recruiting

The Fine Art of Stalking in Recruiting

The Fine Art of Stalking in Recruiting

All great sales people and recruiters do it. “Stalking” is probably too strong a word, but we do check you out. It is vital informational gathering part of a recruiting career. Gathering information prior to contacting a potential client, candidate or before applying to a job is simply invaluable and smart. It takes the cold out of cold calling. LinkedIn, LinkedIn Recruiter, Google, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.  About 48-91% of employers perform a digital search, through these platforms, about a potential new hire. There are fountains of information out there.

It’s Not That Weird

We don’t do it to be creepy or crazy, but as people who want to know you a little better than what your resume says so that we can glean your drivers, motivators and what kind of human being you are. Then, we can get a better feel for you and determine if what we have to sell is what you might want to buy. And vice versa. Recruiting requires a candidate to fit the position. It’s hard to guess the fit otherwise, and with today’s tools, we don’t have to.

We were the kids who would have shared a bond over a dead worm, took that other kid’s hand or punched them on the arm in a cheerful fever and said, “Wanna be friends?” We live to connect. And what better way than to look you up?

But it’s what we do with the information that we collect that enables us to help you grow in either your career, or in your business. The best practices in recruiting are built on optimizing connections and information.

“Stalking” in the Corporate World

Leading the Corporate Recruiting function for a major staffing firm, I look at every single resume that I receive. People try to get past the screeners (it doesn’t work), try out generic messages and cover letters (it doesn’t work), and downright lie (it doesn’t work because we have probably the most cohesive and connected team as a company that I’ve ever worked with and we talk openly with each other often). We’re cautious and careful hirers. And we do our, “homework.”

There are many ways in which to stalk gather information. And you should be doing it, too. Not creepily or crazily! In ways that help you determine if what you have to sell is what someone wants to buy and vice versa.