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Relocating During the Pandemic

Relocating During the Pandemic Can Hurt Your Wallet

Back in July, we wrote an article speculating how remote work will affect salaries. We discussed how relocating during the pandemic to the suburbs or more rural locations could potentially impact your salary while working remotely. Software company VMware is one of the first real indicators of this phenomenon. A new report from Bloomberg reveals that they are allowing some of their staff to work from home permanently. However, there is a catch: if they relocate from their headquarters in Palo Alto, CA, they must accept a pay reduction to compensate for a lower cost of living. So, how will relocating during the pandemic hurt your wallet?

How much will a relocation affect your salary?

In this same report from Bloomberg, they spoke to anonymous workers from VMware. They reported that if they were to leave from Silicon Valley to Denver, they would take an 18% salary cut. And if they just moved to nearby San Diego or LA, their annual salary would take an 8% hit. And although the cost of living in these locations is cheaper, those are considerable decreases in an employee’s annual salary.

Other companies, mostly large tech firms, are considering similar approaches to relocations for remote employees. Twitter is considering a “competitive” approach to localizing compensation, while Facebook blatantly said it might cut their employees’ salaries, depending on where they relocate.

Other companies are taking a different approach

Another report indicates that Stripe, a financial services and software company, is handling remote relocations a little differently. It is rumored that Stripe is offering a $20,000 “relocation” bonus for those relocating from the Bay Area, NY, or Seattle, but is requiring a pay decrease up to 10%. This seems like a more promising approach to receiving a pay cut due to a cheaper cost of living.

There may be other relocation agreements with workers and their employers; however, we may start to see salaries decrease in bigger markets as a result.

What will be the long-term effect?

So, this begs the question: what will the long-term effect be of remote workers relocating? Would you take a pay cut to move to another location with a better cost of living and a smaller population? If you are considering relocating to a cheaper area or to one less densely populated to avoid the virus, here are some of the best places to restart your career after the pandemic.

4 Easy Ways To Set Work From Home Boundaries

4 Easy Ways To Set Work From Home Boundaries

Now that so many professionals are working from home for the inevitable future, it’s essential to draw boundaries. Just because your home and workspaces are now the same, doesn’t mean you shouldn’t have clear boundaries between the two. Since the Coronavirus pandemic, over 69% of employees are experiencing burnout symptoms while working from home. In order to avoid this burnout, you must draw a line between your work duties and home sanctuary. Keep reading for four easy ways to set work from home boundaries to keep your productivity and relaxation at a maximum.

Create A Schedule

The best way to set boundaries for yourself is to create a strict schedule. More importantly, stick to it! We recommend actually scheduling your breaks to ensure that you step away from work consistently. You can even go as far as setting an alarm to signify the end of the workday. This will really help you avoid burnout by drawing a line in the sand between work and home life.

Establish A Defined Workspace

It can be tempting to lounge on the couch all day when you work from home. However, that does blur the line a bit between your two worlds. Not only can it affect your productivity for work, but it can also make you feel obligated to work when you should be relaxing. Choose a designated spot in your home, whether it’s a spare bedroom, a corner of your kitchen table, or even an impromptu card table. Then, use that space for work and only work!

Turn Off Notifications

Most professionals don’t need to be available 24/7. So, when you’re off the clock, make sure to turn off the notifications on your phone! This doesn’t mean you can’t occasionally check email in case an emergency pops up, but it will avoid messages from night owl coworkers disrupting your personal time.

Get Outside

During your scheduled breaks, or even if you just get overwhelmed during the workday, step outside! Take a few moments to soak in the sun, get some fresh air, and clear your mind. You will be amazed at how much better you’ll feel after just a quick jaunt outside.

When you work from home, it’s in everyone’s best interest for your to establish clear boundaries. Ultimately, it will boost your productivity, allow you to stay on top of your home life, and help you avoid burnout. Looking for more work from home tips? Explore our collection of articles!

July 2020 Jobs Report

July 2020 Jobs Report: Three-Straight Months of Job Gains

For the third month in a row, the U.S. economy experienced a growth in jobs despite a spike in COVID-19 cases across many regions of the country. According to the Department of Labor, nonfarm payrolls increased by an additional 1.8 million jobs in July. That’s slightly better than the 1.5 million job gains predicted by economists. As a result of this uptick, the unemployment rate dropped to 10.2% from 11.1% the previous month. Although these numbers are inching closer to pre-pandemic growth, the labor market’s growth is decelerating from last month’s 4.8 million job gains in June.

July 2020 Jobs Report Overview

The addition of 1.8 million jobs is a steep decline from the shocking gain of 4.8 million jobs last month, the most significant single-month increase in U.S. history. However, despite surges in coronavirus cases, the U.S. economy is still adding jobs as many businesses slowly begin to open their doors. “The labor market continues to heal, which is encouraging, but there is a long road ahead,” said Michelle Meyer, head of U.S. economics at Bank of America.

Although improving at a slower rate, these numbers are surprising to many economists as unemployment claims are still trickling in. In the week ending on August 1, adjusted initial unemployment claims reached 1.18 million. As COVID-19 cases continue to soar, it will be interesting to see how this number fluctuates. Some states (such as Texas, Florida, Arizona, and California) may see this number increase, while others will decline as other states relax restrictions.

Additionally, the unemployment rate fell 0.9%, from 11.1% to 10.2%. This decline is a great indication that America is continuing to heal. However, the unemployment rate remains above the Great Recession high of 10% that was reached in October 2009. The labor force participation rate was 61.4%, virtually unchanged from the previous month. But on the brighter side, the average hourly earnings rose by $0.07 to $29.39, a nice surprise for many economists.

Where are the job gains?

Significant employment increases occurred in leisure and hospitality (+592,000), government (+301,000), retail trade (+258,000), professional and business services (+170,000), healthcare (+126,000), social assistance (+66,000), transportation and warehousing (+38,000), manufacturing (+26,000), financial activities (+21,000), and construction (+20,000). All other services industry added 149,000 jobs and mining again saw a decline of jobs (-7,000).

Revisions from previous months

Over the last two months, total nonfarm payroll employment gains were revised. In May, payroll employment increased by 26,000, from +2,699,000 to +2,725,000. In June, payroll gains were revised slightly down by 9,000, from +4,800,000 to +4,791,000. With revision over the last two months combined, employment was 17,000 higher than previously reported.

Get some hiring help in this volatile market

It’s evident from the July 2020 Jobs Report that the economy is still recovering. And as the market continues to heal, employers are starting to gain confidence in their hiring efforts. If you are ready to begin filling your vacant positions, reach out to a recruiter from JSG. We are ready to help you source the talent you need to get production levels back on track. Contact us today, and let’s work together to design a hiring strategy that works for you.

3 Ways Companies Can Offer Flexibility For Employees

3 Ways Companies Can Offer Flexibility For Employees

As states across the country start to establish plans for fall education, many companies are finding themselves needing to adapt. As such, you need to offer options and provide flexibility for employees. Everyone is juggling work, assisting their kids with home learning, and following appropriate social distancing guidelines. Here are three ways you can accommodate your team member’s needs while still allowing for maximum productivity.

Implement Work From Home Flexibility

Dozens of major companies have announced that employees won’t be going back into the office until at least 2021, including Scotiabank, Google, and Indeed. Others like Facebook, Slack, and Zillow have communicated that employees don’t ever have to come back to the office in the same capacity. Due to ever-changing lockdowns and changes to the school system, many companies are forced to come to terms with a new future of work. Whether you offer full-time work from home options or flexible workweeks, your employees need it now more than ever. As Google CEO Sundar Pichai explained in a memo to employees, “I hope this will offer the flexibility you need to balance work with taking care of yourselves and your loved ones over the next 12 months.”

Expand Your PTO Policies

The pandemic has changed how we think about PTO. Former policies consisting of five days of sick time will not fly moving forward when the minimum quarantine time for Coronavirus is 14 days. Provide clear communication about new sick policies to your team often. Make sure they understand proper protocols if they do need to quarantine or take time off to recover.

Establish boundaries

Recent research shows that since the beginning of the pandemic, the average workday has lasted 48.5 minutes longer. Your employees are feeling the pressure of a global pandemic, an economic recession, and increased childcare demands. By setting clear boundaries (everyone logs off at 5 pm, no matter what), you can help your team avoid burnout.

By offering flexibility for employees, you demonstrate your investment in the team. Interested in more management and hiring tips? Explore our client resources!

Remote Work Affect Salaries

Will Remote Work Affect Salaries?

There is no disputing the coronavirus’ impact on the economy and labor market. Economists, healthcare professionals, and others have speculated about the lasting effects of this pandemic. However, one thing that is certain is that millions of workers worldwide have been working from home (WFH) since mid-March. With confirmed cases surpassing 4 million in the U.S. this week, working remote might be a permanent transition. So, how will this shift to remote work affect salaries? It’s a little early to tell, but here is what may happen if this trend continues.

WFH workers are relocating

According to a recent study from Pew Research Center, nearly a fifth of U.S. adults has moved due to COVID-19 or know someone who did. The survey found that 37% of those ages 18 to 29 say they moved, someone moved into their home, or know someone who moved because of the outbreak. Many of these young professionals are relocating away from big cities, such as New York City, and escaping to less populated locations, such as the Midwest. These rural locations offer quiet, wide-open spaces and an affordable cost of living. But will your employer continue to pay your massive big-city salary in cheaper rural areas? Are employers going to start cutting wages for workers that move to regions with a more reasonable cost of living?

The price of the big cities

Living in big metropolitan areas definitely have their appeal – more culture, restaurants, activities, nightlife, and of course, larger salaries. According to a recent study, employers in America’s costliest cities pay at least 40% more for white-collar jobs than the average wage in other regions of the country. For example, a graphic designer makes an average of $31.67 an hour in the top 15 biggest cities versus an average hourly wage of $21.09 in all other regions. Yet, according to the report, “When firms in the highest-priced cities hired workers living in cheaper towns, they tended to pay almost 19% more than the person would earn locally.”

To break this down, workers make more in larger cities, regardless of whether they work locally or remotely. However, that salary range is still enormous. Using the pay scale for a graphic designer, a professional in that field would make 19% more working remotely for a company in a big city. That’s a little more than $4 more an hour, which is a much lower wage than the local workers of big cities making over $10 more an hour.

How will remote work affect wages?

This begs the question: will employers begin to change wages for remote workers to reflect their employees’ cost of living? Facebook is already moving its hiring efforts to focus on remote work to lower its payroll costs. Will other large companies follow through? More professionals working from home may reduce or even fix the insane pay disparity our country faces in some areas. As a result, professionals may consider moving out of expensive cities like NYC and moving to locations with a better quality of life, affordable rents, and overall better happiness ratings.

Time will tell how this virus will ultimately impact our wages across the country. Still, it is worth considering if you are currently working remotely and considering a move to a different region.

How remote work might impact your salary

Surge of Applicants

How To Manage A Surge of Applicants

The tables (unfortunately) have turned for job seekers across the country. Millions of Americans are out of work and are now scrambling to find a new job opportunity. The result has been a surge of applicants for employers of all shapes and sizes. What was once a candidate-driven market is now a job market where employers and hiring managers are in the driver seat. So, if you are one of the many hiring managers receiving an influx in applications, here is how to sift through all of these terrific candidates efficiently.

Focus on skillsets

It is tempting for hiring managers and HR professionals to refine the job applications they have received by eliminating “overqualified” candidates. This is a huge mistake! Thanks to the coronavirus, the unemployment rate is currently 11.1%. Therefore, you will likely get applicants from all different types of backgrounds. So, instead of throwing out an application because someone is “over-educated” or has “too much experience,” focus on skillsets.

If you are the hiring manager, you know what skills are crucial for your open position. Thus, when reviewing applicants, identify candidates that have these must-have skills. This will help you sift through your mountain of candidates and reach out to those who appear to have what your team needs.

Take a close look at applicants’ cover letters

After you filter through the candidates that appear to have the essential skillsets, pair down your applicant pool by cover letters. Many candidates underestimate a cover letter’s power – it gives you a platform to sell yourself and explain all of your qualifications, skills, and passion. If an applicant submits a cover letter with their resume, it shows that they are serious about your opening. Take a few minutes to read through their message. It will be well worth your time as it will give you much more insight into their background, qualifications, and personality. If they go the extra mile in today’s economic climate to write a cover letter for you, you should at least take a moment to review it.

Look for experience outside of your industry

Many hiring managers would prefer candidates that have experience within the same industry as your company. Sure, hiring someone with industry experience might be helpful in certain situations; however, have you thought about the value of bringing someone in who doesn’t have the same industry experience? They may be able to bring different perspectives to the table. This can help your company approach issues that your team has never thought about. And just because they don’t have industry experience doesn’t mean they don’t have the necessary background to do the job. Like we discussed above, focus on skillsets, not getting lost in the nitty-gritty of their qualifications.

So, there you have it. A few simple methods you can utilize to help your team handle a surge of applicants. However, if you are a job seeker looking for some help navigating this challenging job market, here are a few steps you can take to stand out in a sea of applicants.

jobs on the rise

Jobs on the Rise in the Wake of COVID-19

The Coronavirus has definitely left a lasting impact on the U.S. economy for the foreseeable future. The number of unemployment claims skyrocketed from 281,000 to over 3.3 million in a single week in March 2020, the most significant jump since 1982. However, as the economy and labor force start recovering from this mayhem, the pandemic is creating a mini-boom in various parts of the labor market. Here are some of the jobs on the rise in the wake of COVID-19, according to the LinkedIn Workforce Insights:

jobs on the rise

Fast-gaining jobs in the wake of COVID-19

The jobs above are just a few areas in the labor force experiencing a tremendous surge, thanks to the pandemic. Some of the job titles listed above are probably not all that surprising. How many of you have utilized a personal shopper over the last few months? Instacart just raised another $100 million to expand its services throughout the country, demonstrating the growth of personal shoppers throughout the country.

And loan specialists are in high demand with Americans applying for home loans with record-low mortgage rates. Or maybe your family decided to cancel your vacation plans and splurge for an RV loan to have some fun in the outdoors this summer rather than hopping on a plane. Loan specialists are needed at almost every banking institution to accommodate a spike in loan applications.

Oh, and let’s not forget about all of the hard-working warehouse workers. Giants like Walmart and Amazon are in high demand for more warehouse workers as they facilitate a flood of online sales. To illustrate the growth of these workers, the Labor Department reported +99,000 jobs were added in Transportation and Warehousing in last month’s Jobs Report.

Again, these are just a few of the areas that are seeing growth during the pandemic. So, if you are currently looking for a new job or pondering a shift in your career, these areas are an excellent place to start searching!

How to secure one of these growing jobs

So, how do you find one of these jobs on the rise in the wake of COVID-19? This question might be easier than you think. Mostly, it’s just putting in a little extra work and shifting your mindset. That entails boosting your resume and keeping an open mind. However, if you are serious about a pivot in your career, try partnering with a JSG recruiter. We have hundreds of job opportunities with employers that are ready to hire great candidates like you. Take a glimpse at our job board, and let’s work together.

Technological Changes

Technological Changes That Emerged from the Pandemic

The pandemic has sparked some serious technological innovations in the workplace, and we need to understand these changes to stay ahead of the curve. Our workplaces, interfaces, and everything in-between will not look the same as we tread further into 2020. COVID-19 has digitized life as we know it and sparked innovative change in many companies. The pandemic has given rise to rethinking technology, communication, and culture. Stay in the loop by following these three significant technological changes that are taking the world by storm.

A Monumental Spike in AI

The spike in artificial intelligence (AI) since the pandemic broke out has been monumental; almost everyone is starting to incorporate it. Around 73% of organizations are planning to adopt AI within their organization somehow, according to Accenture Technology. Currently, AI might seem like a rare commodity within companies, but soon enough, every company will implement some aspect of AI into their organization. According to Grand View Research, the global AI market is projected to grow from $62.4 billion to $733.7 billion by 2027.

Improved Methods of Communication

The pandemic helped bring so many workplace collaboration tools, productivity applications, and communication software to the market. Companies like Zoom, Slack, Microsoft Teams, and many more have seen a significant increase in use. Between March and April of 2020, Zoom’s daily users jumped from 10 million to 200 million daily users in just one month, illustrating how vital communication tools have become. The pandemic has shown us that communication is key to running a good team, whether in the office or from a screen!

VR Development

Virtual Reality (VR) accelerated its innovations as a result of the pandemic. VR is a fantastic way to train employees by testing workplace scenarios and teaching new skills with little consequence for failure. In a PWC study, researchers found that 275% of people were more confident to apply skills learned after training with VR technology. So, who knows? With that kind of success rate, you might complete all your workplace training through VR in the future.

What Does the Increase in Technology Mean for Me?

With the robust advancements with technology over the last few months, you can take a few steps to stay qualified and aware:

  • Become more tech-savvy.
  • Develop and show-off your tech skills (there are a million helpful tutorials out there!).
  • Improve your communication and diverge your methods of communication.

Technology opens the door to new knowledge, creativity, and career opportunities. Ten years ago, you couldn’t even fathom a career as a ‘drone operator’ or an ‘AI developer;’ these types of tech jobs did not even exist yet. This should excite you! You cannot even imagine the fantastic career opportunities that will come because of technological innovations.

If you’re ready to take the plunge, check out our jobs board for tech jobs across North America!

How To Get Hired In Today’s Job Market

How To Get Hired In Today’s Job Market

There’s no doubt that today’s job market is volatile. No one knows what to expect from day to day. And while that may be intimidating, it doesn’t mean it’s impossible to get hired. It does, however, require a bit of creativity when it comes to your job search. Follow our tips below, and you’ll be well on your way to your next position.

Give Your Resume A Major Boost

As employers start to reopen their doors to hiring, they will be on the lookout for self-starters. While millions of people were put in the same position during the economic shutdown, those who continued to work on their professional development will shine brighter than the rest. Take advantage of free online courses like the ones offered by LinkedIn, Microsoft, and Github.

Prepare To Pivot

The Coronavirus pandemic has permanently altered the way our world goes to work. Millions of jobs have been streamlined, and some won’t return at all. This means you may need to pivot your career path and try something completely different. The good news is that some industries are absolutely booming and are on the hunt for new employees. Explore LinkedIn’s Economic Graph for up to date data on which companies are hiring, the most in-demand job titles, and essential skills.

Put Yourself Out There

We have seen an extremely high number of people gaining employment from a simple post on social media. During challenging economic times, it’s incredible how people band together to lift one another up. Additionally, there are thousands of recruiters combing LinkedIn looking for qualified candidates. Chances are, you’ll be able to make a connection just from putting yourself out there. And the more connections you have, the more exposure you’ll have to opportunities.

Keep An Open Mind

The best thing you can do during uncertain times is to keep an open mind! Nothing is as we imagined it would be right now, and that’s okay. In the meantime, consider doing something totally out of your comfort zone to bring in income. Put your professional skills to use by freelancing. Squeeze your creative juices by opening an Etsy shop to make your favorite hobby profitable. Apply for a contract position to “test-drive” a new role before you dive in full time.

Can’t get enough job search tips? Check out more job search tips below!

Video: How to get a job in today’s job market

June 2020 Jobs Report

June 2020 Jobs Report: A Spark of Light in the Labor Market

Despite recent spikes in COVID-19 cases, the U.S. labor market exemplified signs of recovery in the June 2020 Jobs Report. Last month, non-farm payrolls added 4.8 million jobs in June, much higher than the +2.9 million expected by economists. As a result, the unemployment rate dropped to 11.1%, which is also better than the predicted rate of 12.4%. Overall, we still have a long way to go before we return to our pre-pandemic state, but we have seen a spark of light in the U.S. labor market for two consecutive months.

June 2020 Jobs Report Overview

The addition of 4.8 million jobs is a massive jump from May’s gain of 2.7 million jobs, marking the most significant single-month increase in U.S. history. “The 4.8 million rise in non-farm payrolls in June provides further confirmation that the initial economic rebound has been far faster than we and most others anticipated,” said Michael Pearce, senior U.S. economist at Capital Economics.

These numbers are a little surprising since jobless claims keep rolling in each week. In another report released by the Department of Labor, U.S. unemployment claims clocked in at 1.427 million. However, this contrast is partly because not every unemployed American is returning to work, even after states and counties continue to open. Thus, many of the 4.8 million jobs are new jobs that have been created over the last month.

The unemployment rate declined by 2.2%, from 13.3% in May to 11.1% last month. The labor force participation rate also saw a nice bump to 61.5%, another strong indication that we are well on our way to recovery. Additionally, the number of temporary layoffs in June fell by 4.8 million to a total of 10.6 million, following last month’s trend.

Where are the job gains at?

Significant employment increases occurred in leisure and hospitality (+2.1 million), retail trade (+740,000), education and health services (+568,000), manufacturing (+356,000), professional and business services (+306,000), construction (+158,000), transportation and warehousing (+99,000), wholesale trade (+68,000), financial activities (+32,000), and government (+33,000). Unfortunately, the mining industry continued to lose jobs (-10,000). Employment in all other services industries increased by +357,000.

Revisions from previous months

Over the last couple of months, non-farm payroll employment was revised. In April, employment was declined by 100,000 from -20.7 million to -20.8 million. However, May’s employment levels saw a positive change of +190,000 from +2.5 million to +2.7 million. With these revisions, employment in April and May combined was +90,000 higher than previously reported.

Employers are hiring again

The last two job reports illustrate that the country is beginning to recover. We are far from our pre-pandemic job gain levels and historic-low unemployment rates, but we are making progress. These numbers show the resiliency of our country and employers across the country. If you are currently on the job market, we have hundreds of opportunities with employers that need talent like you. Check out our job board and find the next step in your career today.