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jobs with the most demand

Jobs with the Most Demand in November

Another month down, another group of jobs in high demand. Once again, LinkedIn revealed the jobs that are in the fastest-growing demand this month. Although some jobs from the previous month continue to top the list, we see a new job with outrageous demand. Here is a closer look at the jobs with the most demand in November.

COVID-19 impacts tax season

There are two things guaranteed in life, and one of them is taxes. According to LinkedIn’s job posting data, job openings for Tax Specialists skyrocketed 579%. That is no surprise, as this year’s tax filing deadline was pushed back again to October 15th. Previously, the deadline was postponed from April to July, so we saw a similar spike this past summer. Taxes will be challenging for both companies and the American people, so Tax Specialists will be a hot commodity for months to come.

The holidays spur seasonal hiring

Retail positions remain in high demand as brick and mortar and online retailers ramp up their hiring efforts for the holidays. Retail Associates (+426%), Customer Representatives (+406%), and Merchandisers (+191%) were some of the jobs with the fastest-growing demand. This trend will likely continue into next month as holiday shopping picks up. With even more people relying on Ecommerce for their holiday shopping, there is a massive surge in Fulfillment Specialists (+184%) and Drivers (+155%).

Are more people traveling?

A new job cracked the top ten list: Automotive Technicians. In October, the demand for Automotive Techs jumped +177%, the eighth fastest-growing job in the month. This is likely due to more people traveling, a sign that people are feeling a little more optimistic about the pandemic. And while fewer people are commuting for traditional office jobs, food delivery companies experience a massive spike in business. Last month, Food Delivery Drivers were the sixth-most in-demand job. Thus, as more people utilize these services, vehicles will need maintenance. It will be interesting to watch this trend as more states impose stricter lockdown measures with rising coronavirus cases.

Need help sourcing for these roles?

So, these are the jobs with the fastest-growing demand in December. If you are searching for a new career path, consider exploring one of these roles. And if you are an employer that needs some assistance sourcing some talent for one of these positions (or any other role), reach out to us today. We work hard, we work together, and we work for you.

job market turned a new corner

Has the Job Market Turned A New Corner?

Is the job market turning over a new leaf? According to the Labor Department, more Americans voluntarily left their jobs in September than any other month since the pandemic. Despite the number of coronavirus cases skyrocketing, job openings are increasing, and the number of layoffs is declining. So, has the job market turned a new corner? Let’s take a closer look.

3 million voluntary quits

The US Department of Labor reported this week that the number of people who voluntarily quit their jobs increased to 3.0 million in September. That is the most voluntary quits in the last 7+ months. Additionally, the number of available jobs rose to 6.44 million, and layoffs and discharges decreased to 1.3 million (down 0.9%).

So, in what industries are people quitting their jobs? Increases in voluntary quits were noticeable in the accommodation and food services industry, construction, and professional and business services. The confidence with workers in these industries is also reflected in the latest Jobs Report, showing that these industries have the most significant employment rebounds.

A pandemic-low unemployment rate

The unemployment rate also hit a pandemic-era low last month of 6.9%, down 1% from September. The number of job gains also well surpassed economists’ predictions with the addition of 638,000 nonfarm payrolls. “The rebound continues to have strong momentum, more than people were thinking,” said John Briggs, head of strategy at NatWest Markets. “Private payrolls blowout, the participation rate went up 0.3… People are coming back into the economy, and [the unemployment rate] still went down a full percentage point.” The combination of more job openings and lower unemployment levels is a prominent indicator that the labor market is rebounding.

An unexpected startup boom

Moreover, in a surprising turn of events is a boom in American startups. Business applications crashed when the virus first hit, but the third quarter of 2020 produced the highest number of applications on record. So, as unemployment levels reached an all-time high, thousands of Americans put on their entrepreneurship hats. The largest area for new business formation is online retail, which is interesting because the coronavirus has crushed traditional brick-and-mortar retail.

However, will this spark in startup formations fill our country’s significant unemployment void? As of now, it looks like the job market is turning a new corner. Time will tell, but this boom of optimism is really refreshing as we quickly approach the end of the year.

October 2020 Jobs Report

October 2020 Jobs Report: 638,000 Jobs Added

According to the Labor Department, U.S. employers added 638,000 jobs last month, much than economists projected. This is the sixth month in a row of job gains as the country continues to recover from the pandemic. The unemployment rate also dropped to 6.9%, a whole percentage point lower than September’s rate. The positive results of this month’s report are primarily thanks to the decline in the number of temporary layoffs and a boost in seasonal hiring. Here is an overview of the October 2020 Jobs Report.

October 2020 Jobs Report Overview

U.S. employers are on a six-month streak of adding nonfarm payrolls. And with a massive decline in government workers due to the conclusion of the 2020 census, the Labor Department would have reported over 900,000 nonfarm payroll gains. “The 638,000 rise in nonfarm payrolls in October is stronger than it looks as it included a 147,000 drop in temporary Census employment and, alongside the big fall in the unemployment rate, it suggests that the labor market recovery still has plenty of momentum,” Andrew Hunter, senior U.S. economist for Capital Economics.

This month’s gains are a shock to many economists as the number of positive coronavirus cases continues to surpass daily records. On November 5th, the U.S. reported almost 117,000 new coronavirus cases. And although we have made significant strides in our country’s recovery, there are still 11.1 million unemployed persons (down 1.5 million from last month).

Workers are returning on-site

A noticeable shift in the October Jobs Report was the number of remote workers returning on-site. 21.2% of employees last month worked remotely because of the virus. That is slightly down from September’s rate of 22.7%. This trend will be interesting to watch going forward as the number of positive cases continues to climb. Regardless of this slight decline, millions of people are still working remotely, and hiring managers will have to continue to change their processes to attract them.

Job gains by industry

Last month, U.S. employers added 638,000 nonfarm payrolls. Noticeable job gains occurred in leisure and hospitality (+271,000), professional and business services (+208,000), retail trade (+104,000), construction (+84,000), healthcare and social assistance (+79,000), transportation and warehousing (+63,000), manufacturing (+38,000), financial activities (+31,000), and other services (+47,000). Employment in government fell by 268,000, mostly due to the loss of 147,000 2020 Census workers.

Revision from the previous jobs report

The Labor Department reported that total nonfarm payroll employment gains have increased in previous months. In August, payrolls were revised up by 4,000, from +1,489,000 to +1,493,000, and in September, payrolls were revised up by 11,000, from +661,000 to +672,000. With revisions over the last two months combined, employment was 15,000 more than previously reported.

Find the talent you need before year’s end

We have less than two months left of 2020 (thankfully); it’s time to start thinking about your hiring needs going into the new year. There are millions of talented workers on the market, and you don’t want to wait to scoop them up, or you will miss out. If your hiring team needs assistance navigating this challenging, ever-changing labor market, reach out to us today. We are here to help you start the new year off on the right foot.

post-pandemic workplace

Must-Have Skills in the Post-Pandemic Workplace

As we inch closer to a new year, many job seekers speculate how the workplace will change in the post-pandemic era. With a shift in working environments and job demands will come a new need for specific skill sets. Some of these soft skills were already on the rise before the crises, but three skills will outshine the rest as we move forward. Here are the must-have skills in the post-pandemic workplace.

Self-motivation and direction

With millions of Americans working remotely now (with many making this a permanent transition), managing your motivation and self-direction will be crucial to career success. While working remotely, employees will have to be more self-sufficient with their time management and daily tasks. You may not have the luxury of your manager right around the corner in your office to keep you in check; you must be in control of your career by ensuring your work is done efficiently and within time constraints.

Essentially, workers will have much more independence. This will be a more significant challenge for more entry-level workers and young professionals just starting their careers. Honing self-motivation and direction will be a must-have skill in the post-pandemic workplace.

Communication management

Communication has and always will be an essential soft skill for workers to refine. But with many of us working from home for the foreseeable future, clear communication will be even more critical. It’s much easier to communicate with co-workers and teammates when you are all in the same office. If you have a quick question, you can walk down the hall and receive an immediate answer. However, we may not have that luxury in our current (and future) workplace.

Instead, we will have to adopt more tools and processes to communicate with each other actively. That can be easier said than done with dozens of different tools. For example, you may be chatting with your boss on Microsoft Teams but need to refer to an email or notes on a Google Doc as you work. If you want to continue to be a valuable employee, you must facilitate clear communication management in the post-pandemic workplace.

Adaptability

Adaptability is vital to any successful career in the post-pandemic workplace. Tomorrow may look different than today, and this year will look different than the next. It’s essential that employees can roll with the punches and adapt as needed.

Adaptability comes into play in all facets of work – how we communicate, the tools we utilize, processes, and so much more. Adaptability is about being able to function when you are a little uncomfortable. Taking on new roles as needed or stepping in to solve a problem will set up apart from your co-workers and other candidates when you are searching for new opportunities.

workforce confidence

The Cities With The Highest (and Lowest) Workforce Confidence

The coronavirus has hit cities in waves. Some are thriving, while others are seeing a spike in cases, and as a result, a higher unemployment rate. Over the last eight long months, workers’ confidence in their finances, job stability, and long-term career prospects have fluctuated. LinkedIn’s most recent Workforce Confidence Index surveyed over 33,000 people across the country and examined their confidence in their current and future career outlooks. Here are the cities with the highest (and lowest) workforce confidence.

 The ten most confident cities

The workforce confidence for some cities is strong, with Colorado Springs, CO, Provo, UT, and Tampa, FL leading the way. Many of these top ten cities are in the Sunbelt, which is currently benefiting from steady population growth. These markets are emerging as logistics hubs with new construction, creating thousands of jobs, and attracting both employers and job seekers to these areas. An interesting note is that none of the cities in the top ten are major metro markets, such as New York City, Seattle, or LA.

Here are the top 10 most confident cities, according to LinkedIn:

workforce confidence

The ten least confident cities

On the other side of the coin, workforce confidence in larger, more industrial cities in the Midwest and Westside are feeling much less confident in their career outlooks. Tucson, AZ, Milwaukee, WI, and Las Vegas are cities with notable lower confidence ratings. These are all cities that are lagging behind the rest of the country’s recovery rates.

An intriguing note is that the least confident cities all have unemployment rates above the national average. For example, Nevada’s unemployment rate is 12.4%, which is no surprise given the tourism business generated by Las Vegas.

Here is a list of the least confident cities:

  • Tucson, AZ
  • Milwaukee, WI
  • Grand Rapids, MI
  • Las Vegas, NV
  • Chicago, IL
  • Cincinnati, OH
  • Portland, OR
  • Austin, TX
  • Orlando, FL
  • Sacramento, CA

Some states have a better environment for the pandemic

Naturally, some states were better suited to the social and economic changes that were brought on by the pandemic. One of these is a new trend in outdoor seating for bars and restaurants. Restaurants, pubs, and eateries can have a larger capacity, and therefore, more business with outside seating accommodations. This trend has forced many restaurants to shift their space to allow more outdoor seating. However, with cold weather well on its way, it will be harder for some cities to continue this trend. As a result, this will make it harder for some of these local businesses to survive.

In the end, this list will fluctuate as some cities and states overcome the obstacles caused by the pandemic better than others. It will be interesting to see how these cities adjust in the fourth quarter and into the new year.

pandemic proof

Four Industries That Are Pandemic Proof

Economists, politicians, and everyone in between have discussed how the country is entering a two-track recovery process. Some industries are really struggling to survive throughout the pandemic, while others are flourishing with the social and economic changes. Some industries are even on a hiring spree and are, quite frankly, booming during the coronavirus crisis. Here are four industries that are currently labeled pandemic proof.

IT Industry

IT companies of all kinds are experiencing rapid growth as they try to keep up with the demand of millions of remote workers. Companies like Zoom and Microsoft are thriving right now as they work hard to keep everyone connected virtually. Other IT companies are hard at work, ensuring their customers’ safety and protection of their information. More and more cyber-attacks are occurring as employers battle with employees on less-than-secure home internet networks. Plus, it was easier for tech employees to shift to a remote work environment than other employers.

Ecommerce

The Ecommerce giants have experienced record-breaking growth throughout this challenging year. As consumer spending habits shift to more online-heavy shopping routines, companies like Walmart, Target, and Amazon are booming. If you can buy it online, many consumers are switching to a “safer” online shopping experience to avoid the virus. Thus, warehousing and distribution centers are starting their seasonal hiring surges early to keep up with this swelling demand.

The Mortgage and Finance Industries

Mortgage and finance companies desperately need fresh talent as they struggle to serve a massive influx of new customers. With our current economic turmoil and record-low mortgage rates, financial institutions and other mortgage companies are on a hiring binge. For example, according to Chip Cutter, A Wall Street Journal Report, Fidelity Investments’ hiring is already up 40% on the year, and they need another 4,000 finance professionals. Other companies are in the same boat as customers look to prepare for a messy tax season, make changes to their retirement plans, and refinance their homes. This trend will likely spill over well into next year, illustrating how pandemic proof these two industries are.

Entrepreneurship is also on the rise

For years, enrollment in graduate programs for business was declining. However, a recent report from the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center claims graduate enrollment for the Fall semester of 2020 is up 3.9%. Additionally, about 1.5 million new businesses filed with the IRS in the third quarter this year – that’s up 82% from the previous quarter, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. So, while there are many different startups and business ventures that can be formed, it is encouraging to see a revitalization in entrepreneurship.

4 COVID-19 Hiring Trends

4 COVID-19 Hiring Trends

There’s no denying that the Coronavirus pandemic has changed almost everything about our day-to-day lives over the past year. So, it should not come as a surprise that COVID-19 has significantly impacted hiring trends. If you’re trying to land a job or hire a new team member in 2020, you must understand these four COVID-19 hiring trends.

Remote Hiring Process

Following months of mandatory stay-at-home orders, companies have had to pivot to remote working scenarios. In fact, many have extended their remote work policies through the summer of 2021. As a result, they have also moved their hiring process online.

As a candidate, this means you need to be prepared for a hiring process that will be entirely online. Brush up on your video interview skills, refresh your LinkedIn, and make sure your technology is up to par.

Increase In Remote Positions

Now that hiring managers are more comfortable with having a remote team, they are also changing some positions to be fully remote. If you have wanted a remote position, now is your time to shine! LinkedIn data shows that remote job listings have increased by 2.8x since March 2020.

As a candidate, this means you need to show off your remote working skills. Just because more companies are hiring for more remote candidates doesn’t mean they will hire just anyone. They will be looking for candidates with remote work experience and advanced remote working skills.

Faster Hiring Processes

One of the benefits of COVID-19 hiring trends and entirely remote hiring processes is that they tend to go much faster! It is much easier to schedule remote interviews. Additionally, there are a lot of incredible candidates on the market right now, so hiring managers are more likely to move quickly to secure the talent they need.

As a candidate, this means you must be ready to move! If you have scheduling issues or don’t make a hiring process your priority, there’s a good chance you could lose out on the position to someone more accommodating.

Increase In Temporary Hiring

Because of how COVID-19 has affected the economy, some companies are wary of bringing on permanent employees. This is why temporary contract workers are a perfect fit for 2020. Hiring managers can hire talented candidates on a temporary basis, and maybe even convert them to permanent employees down the road.

As a candidate, this means you’re more marketable if you’re flexible. By sharing that you’re open to contract positions, it makes you more valuable. Be sure to list any previous contract or temporary positions along with any applicable skills.

Have you seen an increase in these COVID-19 Hiring Trends? Whether you’re a candidate looking for a position, or a company interested in bringing on talent, contact us today!

September 2020 Jobs Report

September 2020 Jobs Report: the U.S. Gains 661,000 Payrolls

The Labor Department reported that nonfarm payrolls rose by 661,000. That is the fewest gains since May and much lower than economists’ expectations of around 850,000 payrolls. Regardless of expectations, the unemployment rate continued to decline from 8.4% to 7.9%. Although slower than predicted, the U.S. economy is still on the path of recovery, even as COVID-19 cases continue to surge. Here is an overview of the September 2020 Jobs Report.

September Jobs Report overview

Despite all odds, employers around the nation are continuing to add jobs, although at a slower rate in the last three months. Hiring started to cool in July, with the growth of nearly 2 million positions. There are still roughly 10.7 million Americans out of work than before the pandemic hit in February. However, we have made huge strides over the last seven months when employment fell by more than 22 million, and the unemployment rate hit an all-time high of 14.7%. Fast forward to today, the unemployment rate is sitting at 7.9%, and has been consistently declining since April. Moreover, the number of unemployed Americans declined by 1.0 million to 12.6 million unemployed persons.

The labor force participation rate slightly declined by 0.3%, to 61.4%, which is 2% lower than it was back in February. Additionally, average hourly earnings bumped up 4.8%, to $29.47.

The impact of the coronavirus

As the country continues its battle with the coronavirus, the labor market outlook is a little precarious, despite consistent growth over the summer. Last month, the U.S. surpassed 200,000 deaths from the coronavirus pandemic, and this morning, it was confirmed President Trump tested positive for the virus. This is the final jobs report before the November election. Hopefully, our battle with the virus continues to trend in the right direction, and more employers can create jobs.

Job gains by industry

The industries with the largest employment growth are leisure and hospitality (+318,000), retail trade (+142,000), healthcare and social assistance (+108,000), professional and business services (+89,000), transportation and warehousing (+74,000), manufacturing (+66,000), financial activities (+37,000), information (+27,000), construction (+27,000), wholesale trade (+19,000), and mining (+1,000). Government payroll declined by 216,000 and private education fell by 69,000.

Revisions from the previous jobs report

Over the last two months, total nonfarm payroll employment gains were revised. In July, payrolls were revised up by 27,000, from +1,734,000 to +1,761,000, and in August, payrolls were revised up by 118,000, from +1,371,000 to 1,489,000. With revisions over the last two months combined, employment was 145,000 more than previously reported.

Are you ready to harvest more jobs this fall?

More employers are gaining confidence in the labor market and jumpstarting their hiring efforts. Plus, seasonal hiring is about to be kicked into high gear as employers will go on a hiring spree to keep up with seasonal demand this fall. If your team is ready to revive your hiring efforts, JSG is here to help. We have a solid grasp on the market and a strong pipeline of candidates that are ready to work. Reach out to us today, and let’s work together to fill your job vacancies.

Be a FLU FIGHTER This Year

Be a FLU FIGHTER This Year

The 2020-2021 flu season will be challenging due to the current battle against the COVID-19 worldwide pandemic. The CDC (Centers for Disease Control) emphasizes that getting a flu vaccine is more important than ever this year. It is essential to protect yourself and the people around you from the flu and help reduce the strain on healthcare systems responding to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Contact your PCP (primary care physician) and speak with them about obtaining your flu shot today! Now more than ever, please make your health and safety a priority! For more information on flu prevention and the flu vaccine, please visit the CDC’s website.

Below are some resources from the CDC that share the importance of receiving a flu shot this year to help us stay healthy and safe.

be a flu fighter

Pregnant? You Need A Flu Shot!

Flu can be a serious illness, especially when you are pregnant. Getting the flu can cause serious problems when you are pregnant. Even if you are generally healthy, changes in immune, heart, and lung functions during pregnancy make you more likely to get severely ill from the flu. Pregnant women (and women up to two weeks postpartum) who get flu are at high risk of developing a serious illness, including being hospitalized.

A Strong Defense Against Flu: Get Vaccinated!

The best way to protect yourself and your loved ones against influenza (flu) are to get a flu vaccine every flu season. Flu is a contagious respiratory disease that can lead to serious illness, hospitalization, or even death. CDC recommends everyone six months and older get an annual flu vaccine.

Here are some key reasons to get a flu vaccine this year.

Influenza Vaccine: Who Should Get It, And Who Should Not

Everyone 6 months and older is recommended for annual influenza vaccination, with rare exceptions. For the 2020-2021 flu season, ACIP recommends annual influenza vaccination for everyone 6 months and older with any licensed, appropriate influenza vaccine (IIV, RIV4, LAIV4, or nasal spray) with no preference expressed for any one vaccine over another. Some vaccines are not recommended in some situations and for people of certain ages or with certain health conditions, and some people should not receive influenza vaccines at all (though this is uncommon).

Different flu shots are approved for people of different ages. Everyone should get a vaccine that is appropriate for their age.

If you want the flu to stay away, go and get your flu shot today!

Relocating During the Pandemic

Relocating During the Pandemic Can Hurt Your Wallet

Back in July, we wrote an article speculating how remote work will affect salaries. We discussed how relocating during the pandemic to the suburbs or more rural locations could potentially impact your salary while working remotely. Software company VMware is one of the first real indicators of this phenomenon. A new report from Bloomberg reveals that they are allowing some of their staff to work from home permanently. However, there is a catch: if they relocate from their headquarters in Palo Alto, CA, they must accept a pay reduction to compensate for a lower cost of living. So, how will relocating during the pandemic hurt your wallet?

How much will a relocation affect your salary?

In this same report from Bloomberg, they spoke to anonymous workers from VMware. They reported that if they were to leave from Silicon Valley to Denver, they would take an 18% salary cut. And if they just moved to nearby San Diego or LA, their annual salary would take an 8% hit. And although the cost of living in these locations is cheaper, those are considerable decreases in an employee’s annual salary.

Other companies, mostly large tech firms, are considering similar approaches to relocations for remote employees. Twitter is considering a “competitive” approach to localizing compensation, while Facebook blatantly said it might cut their employees’ salaries, depending on where they relocate.

Other companies are taking a different approach

Another report indicates that Stripe, a financial services and software company, is handling remote relocations a little differently. It is rumored that Stripe is offering a $20,000 “relocation” bonus for those relocating from the Bay Area, NY, or Seattle, but is requiring a pay decrease up to 10%. This seems like a more promising approach to receiving a pay cut due to a cheaper cost of living.

There may be other relocation agreements with workers and their employers; however, we may start to see salaries decrease in bigger markets as a result.

What will be the long-term effect?

So, this begs the question: what will the long-term effect be of remote workers relocating? Would you take a pay cut to move to another location with a better cost of living and a smaller population? If you are considering relocating to a cheaper area or to one less densely populated to avoid the virus, here are some of the best places to restart your career after the pandemic.