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pandemic proof

Four Industries That Are Pandemic Proof

Economists, politicians, and everyone in between have discussed how the country is entering a two-track recovery process. Some industries are really struggling to survive throughout the pandemic, while others are flourishing with the social and economic changes. Some industries are even on a hiring spree and are, quite frankly, booming during the coronavirus crisis. Here are four industries that are currently labeled pandemic proof.

IT Industry

IT companies of all kinds are experiencing rapid growth as they try to keep up with the demand of millions of remote workers. Companies like Zoom and Microsoft are thriving right now as they work hard to keep everyone connected virtually. Other IT companies are hard at work, ensuring their customers’ safety and protection of their information. More and more cyber-attacks are occurring as employers battle with employees on less-than-secure home internet networks. Plus, it was easier for tech employees to shift to a remote work environment than other employers.

Ecommerce

The Ecommerce giants have experienced record-breaking growth throughout this challenging year. As consumer spending habits shift to more online-heavy shopping routines, companies like Walmart, Target, and Amazon are booming. If you can buy it online, many consumers are switching to a “safer” online shopping experience to avoid the virus. Thus, warehousing and distribution centers are starting their seasonal hiring surges early to keep up with this swelling demand.

The Mortgage and Finance Industries

Mortgage and finance companies desperately need fresh talent as they struggle to serve a massive influx of new customers. With our current economic turmoil and record-low mortgage rates, financial institutions and other mortgage companies are on a hiring binge. For example, according to Chip Cutter, A Wall Street Journal Report, Fidelity Investments’ hiring is already up 40% on the year, and they need another 4,000 finance professionals. Other companies are in the same boat as customers look to prepare for a messy tax season, make changes to their retirement plans, and refinance their homes. This trend will likely spill over well into next year, illustrating how pandemic proof these two industries are.

Entrepreneurship is also on the rise

For years, enrollment in graduate programs for business was declining. However, a recent report from the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center claims graduate enrollment for the Fall semester of 2020 is up 3.9%. Additionally, about 1.5 million new businesses filed with the IRS in the third quarter this year – that’s up 82% from the previous quarter, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. So, while there are many different startups and business ventures that can be formed, it is encouraging to see a revitalization in entrepreneurship.

4 COVID-19 Hiring Trends

4 COVID-19 Hiring Trends

There’s no denying that the Coronavirus pandemic has changed almost everything about our day-to-day lives over the past year. So, it should not come as a surprise that COVID-19 has significantly impacted hiring trends. If you’re trying to land a job or hire a new team member in 2020, you must understand these four COVID-19 hiring trends.

Remote Hiring Process

Following months of mandatory stay-at-home orders, companies have had to pivot to remote working scenarios. In fact, many have extended their remote work policies through the summer of 2021. As a result, they have also moved their hiring process online.

As a candidate, this means you need to be prepared for a hiring process that will be entirely online. Brush up on your video interview skills, refresh your LinkedIn, and make sure your technology is up to par.

Increase In Remote Positions

Now that hiring managers are more comfortable with having a remote team, they are also changing some positions to be fully remote. If you have wanted a remote position, now is your time to shine! LinkedIn data shows that remote job listings have increased by 2.8x since March 2020.

As a candidate, this means you need to show off your remote working skills. Just because more companies are hiring for more remote candidates doesn’t mean they will hire just anyone. They will be looking for candidates with remote work experience and advanced remote working skills.

Faster Hiring Processes

One of the benefits of COVID-19 hiring trends and entirely remote hiring processes is that they tend to go much faster! It is much easier to schedule remote interviews. Additionally, there are a lot of incredible candidates on the market right now, so hiring managers are more likely to move quickly to secure the talent they need.

As a candidate, this means you must be ready to move! If you have scheduling issues or don’t make a hiring process your priority, there’s a good chance you could lose out on the position to someone more accommodating.

Increase In Temporary Hiring

Because of how COVID-19 has affected the economy, some companies are wary of bringing on permanent employees. This is why temporary contract workers are a perfect fit for 2020. Hiring managers can hire talented candidates on a temporary basis, and maybe even convert them to permanent employees down the road.

As a candidate, this means you’re more marketable if you’re flexible. By sharing that you’re open to contract positions, it makes you more valuable. Be sure to list any previous contract or temporary positions along with any applicable skills.

Have you seen an increase in these COVID-19 Hiring Trends? Whether you’re a candidate looking for a position, or a company interested in bringing on talent, contact us today!

September 2020 Jobs Report

September 2020 Jobs Report: the U.S. Gains 661,000 Payrolls

The Labor Department reported that nonfarm payrolls rose by 661,000. That is the fewest gains since May and much lower than economists’ expectations of around 850,000 payrolls. Regardless of expectations, the unemployment rate continued to decline from 8.4% to 7.9%. Although slower than predicted, the U.S. economy is still on the path of recovery, even as COVID-19 cases continue to surge. Here is an overview of the September 2020 Jobs Report.

September Jobs Report overview

Despite all odds, employers around the nation are continuing to add jobs, although at a slower rate in the last three months. Hiring started to cool in July, with the growth of nearly 2 million positions. There are still roughly 10.7 million Americans out of work than before the pandemic hit in February. However, we have made huge strides over the last seven months when employment fell by more than 22 million, and the unemployment rate hit an all-time high of 14.7%. Fast forward to today, the unemployment rate is sitting at 7.9%, and has been consistently declining since April. Moreover, the number of unemployed Americans declined by 1.0 million to 12.6 million unemployed persons.

The labor force participation rate slightly declined by 0.3%, to 61.4%, which is 2% lower than it was back in February. Additionally, average hourly earnings bumped up 4.8%, to $29.47.

The impact of the coronavirus

As the country continues its battle with the coronavirus, the labor market outlook is a little precarious, despite consistent growth over the summer. Last month, the U.S. surpassed 200,000 deaths from the coronavirus pandemic, and this morning, it was confirmed President Trump tested positive for the virus. This is the final jobs report before the November election. Hopefully, our battle with the virus continues to trend in the right direction, and more employers can create jobs.

Job gains by industry

The industries with the largest employment growth are leisure and hospitality (+318,000), retail trade (+142,000), healthcare and social assistance (+108,000), professional and business services (+89,000), transportation and warehousing (+74,000), manufacturing (+66,000), financial activities (+37,000), information (+27,000), construction (+27,000), wholesale trade (+19,000), and mining (+1,000). Government payroll declined by 216,000 and private education fell by 69,000.

Revisions from the previous jobs report

Over the last two months, total nonfarm payroll employment gains were revised. In July, payrolls were revised up by 27,000, from +1,734,000 to +1,761,000, and in August, payrolls were revised up by 118,000, from +1,371,000 to 1,489,000. With revisions over the last two months combined, employment was 145,000 more than previously reported.

Are you ready to harvest more jobs this fall?

More employers are gaining confidence in the labor market and jumpstarting their hiring efforts. Plus, seasonal hiring is about to be kicked into high gear as employers will go on a hiring spree to keep up with seasonal demand this fall. If your team is ready to revive your hiring efforts, JSG is here to help. We have a solid grasp on the market and a strong pipeline of candidates that are ready to work. Reach out to us today, and let’s work together to fill your job vacancies.

Be a FLU FIGHTER This Year

Be a FLU FIGHTER This Year

The 2020-2021 flu season will be challenging due to the current battle against the COVID-19 worldwide pandemic. The CDC (Centers for Disease Control) emphasizes that getting a flu vaccine is more important than ever this year. It is essential to protect yourself and the people around you from the flu and help reduce the strain on healthcare systems responding to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Contact your PCP (primary care physician) and speak with them about obtaining your flu shot today! Now more than ever, please make your health and safety a priority! For more information on flu prevention and the flu vaccine, please visit the CDC’s website.

Below are some resources from the CDC that share the importance of receiving a flu shot this year to help us stay healthy and safe.

be a flu fighter

Pregnant? You Need A Flu Shot!

Flu can be a serious illness, especially when you are pregnant. Getting the flu can cause serious problems when you are pregnant. Even if you are generally healthy, changes in immune, heart, and lung functions during pregnancy make you more likely to get severely ill from the flu. Pregnant women (and women up to two weeks postpartum) who get flu are at high risk of developing a serious illness, including being hospitalized.

A Strong Defense Against Flu: Get Vaccinated!

The best way to protect yourself and your loved ones against influenza (flu) are to get a flu vaccine every flu season. Flu is a contagious respiratory disease that can lead to serious illness, hospitalization, or even death. CDC recommends everyone six months and older get an annual flu vaccine.

Here are some key reasons to get a flu vaccine this year.

Influenza Vaccine: Who Should Get It, And Who Should Not

Everyone 6 months and older is recommended for annual influenza vaccination, with rare exceptions. For the 2020-2021 flu season, ACIP recommends annual influenza vaccination for everyone 6 months and older with any licensed, appropriate influenza vaccine (IIV, RIV4, LAIV4, or nasal spray) with no preference expressed for any one vaccine over another. Some vaccines are not recommended in some situations and for people of certain ages or with certain health conditions, and some people should not receive influenza vaccines at all (though this is uncommon).

Different flu shots are approved for people of different ages. Everyone should get a vaccine that is appropriate for their age.

If you want the flu to stay away, go and get your flu shot today!

Relocating During the Pandemic

Relocating During the Pandemic Can Hurt Your Wallet

Back in July, we wrote an article speculating how remote work will affect salaries. We discussed how relocating during the pandemic to the suburbs or more rural locations could potentially impact your salary while working remotely. Software company VMware is one of the first real indicators of this phenomenon. A new report from Bloomberg reveals that they are allowing some of their staff to work from home permanently. However, there is a catch: if they relocate from their headquarters in Palo Alto, CA, they must accept a pay reduction to compensate for a lower cost of living. So, how will relocating during the pandemic hurt your wallet?

How much will a relocation affect your salary?

In this same report from Bloomberg, they spoke to anonymous workers from VMware. They reported that if they were to leave from Silicon Valley to Denver, they would take an 18% salary cut. And if they just moved to nearby San Diego or LA, their annual salary would take an 8% hit. And although the cost of living in these locations is cheaper, those are considerable decreases in an employee’s annual salary.

Other companies, mostly large tech firms, are considering similar approaches to relocations for remote employees. Twitter is considering a “competitive” approach to localizing compensation, while Facebook blatantly said it might cut their employees’ salaries, depending on where they relocate.

Other companies are taking a different approach

Another report indicates that Stripe, a financial services and software company, is handling remote relocations a little differently. It is rumored that Stripe is offering a $20,000 “relocation” bonus for those relocating from the Bay Area, NY, or Seattle, but is requiring a pay decrease up to 10%. This seems like a more promising approach to receiving a pay cut due to a cheaper cost of living.

There may be other relocation agreements with workers and their employers; however, we may start to see salaries decrease in bigger markets as a result.

What will be the long-term effect?

So, this begs the question: what will the long-term effect be of remote workers relocating? Would you take a pay cut to move to another location with a better cost of living and a smaller population? If you are considering relocating to a cheaper area or to one less densely populated to avoid the virus, here are some of the best places to restart your career after the pandemic.

July 2020 Jobs Report

July 2020 Jobs Report: Three-Straight Months of Job Gains

For the third month in a row, the U.S. economy experienced a growth in jobs despite a spike in COVID-19 cases across many regions of the country. According to the Department of Labor, nonfarm payrolls increased by an additional 1.8 million jobs in July. That’s slightly better than the 1.5 million job gains predicted by economists. As a result of this uptick, the unemployment rate dropped to 10.2% from 11.1% the previous month. Although these numbers are inching closer to pre-pandemic growth, the labor market’s growth is decelerating from last month’s 4.8 million job gains in June.

July 2020 Jobs Report Overview

The addition of 1.8 million jobs is a steep decline from the shocking gain of 4.8 million jobs last month, the most significant single-month increase in U.S. history. However, despite surges in coronavirus cases, the U.S. economy is still adding jobs as many businesses slowly begin to open their doors. “The labor market continues to heal, which is encouraging, but there is a long road ahead,” said Michelle Meyer, head of U.S. economics at Bank of America.

Although improving at a slower rate, these numbers are surprising to many economists as unemployment claims are still trickling in. In the week ending on August 1, adjusted initial unemployment claims reached 1.18 million. As COVID-19 cases continue to soar, it will be interesting to see how this number fluctuates. Some states (such as Texas, Florida, Arizona, and California) may see this number increase, while others will decline as other states relax restrictions.

Additionally, the unemployment rate fell 0.9%, from 11.1% to 10.2%. This decline is a great indication that America is continuing to heal. However, the unemployment rate remains above the Great Recession high of 10% that was reached in October 2009. The labor force participation rate was 61.4%, virtually unchanged from the previous month. But on the brighter side, the average hourly earnings rose by $0.07 to $29.39, a nice surprise for many economists.

Where are the job gains?

Significant employment increases occurred in leisure and hospitality (+592,000), government (+301,000), retail trade (+258,000), professional and business services (+170,000), healthcare (+126,000), social assistance (+66,000), transportation and warehousing (+38,000), manufacturing (+26,000), financial activities (+21,000), and construction (+20,000). All other services industry added 149,000 jobs and mining again saw a decline of jobs (-7,000).

Revisions from previous months

Over the last two months, total nonfarm payroll employment gains were revised. In May, payroll employment increased by 26,000, from +2,699,000 to +2,725,000. In June, payroll gains were revised slightly down by 9,000, from +4,800,000 to +4,791,000. With revision over the last two months combined, employment was 17,000 higher than previously reported.

Get some hiring help in this volatile market

It’s evident from the July 2020 Jobs Report that the economy is still recovering. And as the market continues to heal, employers are starting to gain confidence in their hiring efforts. If you are ready to begin filling your vacant positions, reach out to a recruiter from JSG. We are ready to help you source the talent you need to get production levels back on track. Contact us today, and let’s work together to design a hiring strategy that works for you.

Remote Work Affect Salaries

Will Remote Work Affect Salaries?

There is no disputing the coronavirus’ impact on the economy and labor market. Economists, healthcare professionals, and others have speculated about the lasting effects of this pandemic. However, one thing that is certain is that millions of workers worldwide have been working from home (WFH) since mid-March. With confirmed cases surpassing 4 million in the U.S. this week, working remote might be a permanent transition. So, how will this shift to remote work affect salaries? It’s a little early to tell, but here is what may happen if this trend continues.

WFH workers are relocating

According to a recent study from Pew Research Center, nearly a fifth of U.S. adults has moved due to COVID-19 or know someone who did. The survey found that 37% of those ages 18 to 29 say they moved, someone moved into their home, or know someone who moved because of the outbreak. Many of these young professionals are relocating away from big cities, such as New York City, and escaping to less populated locations, such as the Midwest. These rural locations offer quiet, wide-open spaces and an affordable cost of living. But will your employer continue to pay your massive big-city salary in cheaper rural areas? Are employers going to start cutting wages for workers that move to regions with a more reasonable cost of living?

The price of the big cities

Living in big metropolitan areas definitely have their appeal – more culture, restaurants, activities, nightlife, and of course, larger salaries. According to a recent study, employers in America’s costliest cities pay at least 40% more for white-collar jobs than the average wage in other regions of the country. For example, a graphic designer makes an average of $31.67 an hour in the top 15 biggest cities versus an average hourly wage of $21.09 in all other regions. Yet, according to the report, “When firms in the highest-priced cities hired workers living in cheaper towns, they tended to pay almost 19% more than the person would earn locally.”

To break this down, workers make more in larger cities, regardless of whether they work locally or remotely. However, that salary range is still enormous. Using the pay scale for a graphic designer, a professional in that field would make 19% more working remotely for a company in a big city. That’s a little more than $4 more an hour, which is a much lower wage than the local workers of big cities making over $10 more an hour.

How will remote work affect wages?

This begs the question: will employers begin to change wages for remote workers to reflect their employees’ cost of living? Facebook is already moving its hiring efforts to focus on remote work to lower its payroll costs. Will other large companies follow through? More professionals working from home may reduce or even fix the insane pay disparity our country faces in some areas. As a result, professionals may consider moving out of expensive cities like NYC and moving to locations with a better quality of life, affordable rents, and overall better happiness ratings.

Time will tell how this virus will ultimately impact our wages across the country. Still, it is worth considering if you are currently working remotely and considering a move to a different region.

How remote work might impact your salary

Surge of Applicants

How To Manage A Surge of Applicants

The tables (unfortunately) have turned for job seekers across the country. Millions of Americans are out of work and are now scrambling to find a new job opportunity. The result has been a surge of applicants for employers of all shapes and sizes. What was once a candidate-driven market is now a job market where employers and hiring managers are in the driver seat. So, if you are one of the many hiring managers receiving an influx in applications, here is how to sift through all of these terrific candidates efficiently.

Focus on skillsets

It is tempting for hiring managers and HR professionals to refine the job applications they have received by eliminating “overqualified” candidates. This is a huge mistake! Thanks to the coronavirus, the unemployment rate is currently 11.1%. Therefore, you will likely get applicants from all different types of backgrounds. So, instead of throwing out an application because someone is “over-educated” or has “too much experience,” focus on skillsets.

If you are the hiring manager, you know what skills are crucial for your open position. Thus, when reviewing applicants, identify candidates that have these must-have skills. This will help you sift through your mountain of candidates and reach out to those who appear to have what your team needs.

Take a close look at applicants’ cover letters

After you filter through the candidates that appear to have the essential skillsets, pair down your applicant pool by cover letters. Many candidates underestimate a cover letter’s power – it gives you a platform to sell yourself and explain all of your qualifications, skills, and passion. If an applicant submits a cover letter with their resume, it shows that they are serious about your opening. Take a few minutes to read through their message. It will be well worth your time as it will give you much more insight into their background, qualifications, and personality. If they go the extra mile in today’s economic climate to write a cover letter for you, you should at least take a moment to review it.

Look for experience outside of your industry

Many hiring managers would prefer candidates that have experience within the same industry as your company. Sure, hiring someone with industry experience might be helpful in certain situations; however, have you thought about the value of bringing someone in who doesn’t have the same industry experience? They may be able to bring different perspectives to the table. This can help your company approach issues that your team has never thought about. And just because they don’t have industry experience doesn’t mean they don’t have the necessary background to do the job. Like we discussed above, focus on skillsets, not getting lost in the nitty-gritty of their qualifications.

So, there you have it. A few simple methods you can utilize to help your team handle a surge of applicants. However, if you are a job seeker looking for some help navigating this challenging job market, here are a few steps you can take to stand out in a sea of applicants.

jobs on the rise

Jobs on the Rise in the Wake of COVID-19

The Coronavirus has definitely left a lasting impact on the U.S. economy for the foreseeable future. The number of unemployment claims skyrocketed from 281,000 to over 3.3 million in a single week in March 2020, the most significant jump since 1982. However, as the economy and labor force start recovering from this mayhem, the pandemic is creating a mini-boom in various parts of the labor market. Here are some of the jobs on the rise in the wake of COVID-19, according to the LinkedIn Workforce Insights:

jobs on the rise

Fast-gaining jobs in the wake of COVID-19

The jobs above are just a few areas in the labor force experiencing a tremendous surge, thanks to the pandemic. Some of the job titles listed above are probably not all that surprising. How many of you have utilized a personal shopper over the last few months? Instacart just raised another $100 million to expand its services throughout the country, demonstrating the growth of personal shoppers throughout the country.

And loan specialists are in high demand with Americans applying for home loans with record-low mortgage rates. Or maybe your family decided to cancel your vacation plans and splurge for an RV loan to have some fun in the outdoors this summer rather than hopping on a plane. Loan specialists are needed at almost every banking institution to accommodate a spike in loan applications.

Oh, and let’s not forget about all of the hard-working warehouse workers. Giants like Walmart and Amazon are in high demand for more warehouse workers as they facilitate a flood of online sales. To illustrate the growth of these workers, the Labor Department reported +99,000 jobs were added in Transportation and Warehousing in last month’s Jobs Report.

Again, these are just a few of the areas that are seeing growth during the pandemic. So, if you are currently looking for a new job or pondering a shift in your career, these areas are an excellent place to start searching!

How to secure one of these growing jobs

So, how do you find one of these jobs on the rise in the wake of COVID-19? This question might be easier than you think. Mostly, it’s just putting in a little extra work and shifting your mindset. That entails boosting your resume and keeping an open mind. However, if you are serious about a pivot in your career, try partnering with a JSG recruiter. We have hundreds of job opportunities with employers that are ready to hire great candidates like you. Take a glimpse at our job board, and let’s work together.

Technological Changes

Technological Changes That Emerged from the Pandemic

The pandemic has sparked some serious technological innovations in the workplace, and we need to understand these changes to stay ahead of the curve. Our workplaces, interfaces, and everything in-between will not look the same as we tread further into 2020. COVID-19 has digitized life as we know it and sparked innovative change in many companies. The pandemic has given rise to rethinking technology, communication, and culture. Stay in the loop by following these three significant technological changes that are taking the world by storm.

A Monumental Spike in AI

The spike in artificial intelligence (AI) since the pandemic broke out has been monumental; almost everyone is starting to incorporate it. Around 73% of organizations are planning to adopt AI within their organization somehow, according to Accenture Technology. Currently, AI might seem like a rare commodity within companies, but soon enough, every company will implement some aspect of AI into their organization. According to Grand View Research, the global AI market is projected to grow from $62.4 billion to $733.7 billion by 2027.

Improved Methods of Communication

The pandemic helped bring so many workplace collaboration tools, productivity applications, and communication software to the market. Companies like Zoom, Slack, Microsoft Teams, and many more have seen a significant increase in use. Between March and April of 2020, Zoom’s daily users jumped from 10 million to 200 million daily users in just one month, illustrating how vital communication tools have become. The pandemic has shown us that communication is key to running a good team, whether in the office or from a screen!

VR Development

Virtual Reality (VR) accelerated its innovations as a result of the pandemic. VR is a fantastic way to train employees by testing workplace scenarios and teaching new skills with little consequence for failure. In a PWC study, researchers found that 275% of people were more confident to apply skills learned after training with VR technology. So, who knows? With that kind of success rate, you might complete all your workplace training through VR in the future.

What Does the Increase in Technology Mean for Me?

With the robust advancements with technology over the last few months, you can take a few steps to stay qualified and aware:

  • Become more tech-savvy.
  • Develop and show-off your tech skills (there are a million helpful tutorials out there!).
  • Improve your communication and diverge your methods of communication.

Technology opens the door to new knowledge, creativity, and career opportunities. Ten years ago, you couldn’t even fathom a career as a ‘drone operator’ or an ‘AI developer;’ these types of tech jobs did not even exist yet. This should excite you! You cannot even imagine the fantastic career opportunities that will come because of technological innovations.

If you’re ready to take the plunge, check out our jobs board for tech jobs across North America!