Look Out For These Job Search Red Flags

Look Out For These Job Search Red Flags 🚩

There are millions of open jobs right now, with thousands of companies desperate to add to their teams. So, how do you sift through this abundance to find the job that is right for you? In addition to finding a position that matches your skillset, experience, and target benefits, there are a few things you’ll want to avoid. Here are three major job search red flags you should dodge at all costs.

High Turnover Rate

According to a LinkedIn poll, this was the most glaring job search red flag. A high turnover rate implies that there is a reason employees keep leaving. This trend could be due to several factors such as low salaries, overworking, or poor leadership. No matter what, it’s worth further investigation. Don’t be afraid to address this observation during an interview to understand the company culture better.

Lack of Salary Transparency

While lack of salary transparency was the norm for many years, it is now becoming unacceptable. (In California, it’s even illegal!) A company or recruiter should be open to discussing a salary range for the position throughout the interview process. That way, both parties can ensure that they aren’t wasting time. “Depends on experience” isn’t a satisfactory answer, either.

Saying “We’re Like A Family”

This job search red flag is a little more obscure but still important to note. While it may not seem negative at first, consider what a “family” atmosphere at work is like. Oftentimes, this means the boundaries of professionalism are blurred. Personal drama may be the norm in this work atmosphere, and you could potentially find yourself immersed in a culture of overwork and unhealthy expectations. If someone mentions this during an interview, ask them to clarify further what makes the culture feel “like a family.”

Lack of Commitment to Diversity & Inclusion

The biggest “other” red flag that people mentioned in the comments of the LinkedIn poll was a lack of commitment to diversity and inclusion. While this has been a hot-button issue over the last few years, few companies are acting on it appropriately. Look for a company that commits to diversity and inclusion and the programs and resources to back it up. No one wants to feel like a pawn, hired solely to help fulfill a diversity quota. Dig deep during your job search and interview process to understand the full spectrum of steps a company takes to improve diversity and inclusion on their teams.

Remember, a red flag isn’t a conclusive decision about whether a company or job is good or not. Instead, it is a sign that you should investigate further. Looking for more job search and interview advice? Explore our candidate resources here.