employee referral

The Power of An Employee Referral

Many candidates underestimate the power of an employee referral when it comes to your job search. A referral is never a sure-fire way to a new job; however, they can improve your odds of a hiring manager or recruiter reviewing your application. A referral from a former colleague or professional connection is an endorsement for a particular position. Securing a referral will require more legwork, but in today’s job market, it is worth the extra effort.

Almost guarantees a resume read

When a former colleague, classmate, or a personal friend refers you to their employer, it almost guarantees that a hiring manager or recruiter will review your resume. When there are dozens or even hundreds of resumes to review for an open position, recruiters will almost always take a co-worker’s referral seriously. After all, if someone is willing to stick their neck out and recommend a candidate, putting their reputation on the line, a recruiter will likely take a look at your resume. If you receive a good referral, you can expect your resume to be put on top of the pile.

Employee referral programs are there for a reason

Employee referral programs exist for a reason – they typically produce better candidates. Many employers reward their staff for successful employee referrals to encourage good recommendations for candidates. We have an employee referral program at JSG to encourage our team to recommend new candidates! A good referral can save a company a ton of time in the hiring process, reduce costs associated with vacancies and recruiting efforts, and, ultimately, generate better candidates. So, if a company has a formal program for referrals, you, as the candidate, will likely get the benefit of the doubt, and a recruiter or hiring manager may spend a little more time reviewing your resume. It’s a win-win for everyone!

How to secure an employee referral

It will take some time and effort to secure an employee referral; it will also take some foresight. Securing a referral is much easier if you have a prospective employer in mind. You can then see if you have any connections that work (or have previously worked) there. It will also take some networking. It is challenging to secure a referral if you are not putting yourself out there. You must engage with your professional network on LinkedIn, reach out to new connections, and let your job search be known to the public. You must continue to network throughout your job search, so you are at the forefront of your connections’ minds when a new position opens up at their company.